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As an assignment in school, we have to write a C++ program and returns different error codes in the main.

The problem is that we have to return -2 if a specific error occurs but I have no idea how to return a negative value.

For example:

int main()
{ 
    int a = -2; 
    return a;
}

In windows this gives me a return value like: 42232684 and in Linux there is: 253

Why -2 is not allowed?

And how can I manage to get -2?

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1  
How do you check the return value? –  Kiril Kirov Sep 19 '13 at 9:11
1  
You can't do it. Termination status is unsigned. Are you sure the assignment really wants this in the program's termination status, and not stdout? –  Barmar Sep 19 '13 at 9:12
2  
According to the standard, the return value of main() is passed to std::exit(int). From there, by C++11 § 18.5, "If status is zero or EXIT_SUCCESS, an implementation-defined form of the status successful termination is returned. If status is EXIT_FAILURE, an implementation-defined form of the status unsuccessful termination is returned. Otherwise the status returned is implementation-defined.". So if you're looking for a standard-manadated return value to the host OS, you're not going to find one. –  WhozCraig Sep 19 '13 at 9:18
1  
On Linux you display the exit code with echo $?. –  Barmar Sep 19 '13 at 9:18
5  
That's damn good question, especially for user, just signed in! This is really rare case :) –  Kiril Kirov Sep 19 '13 at 9:20
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The problem is that what is returned to the OS is then interpreted by the OS shell as IT likes it, not as your program likes.

the main function returns an int, and return -2 is just what your program has to do.

253 is -2 in 2s complement onto 8 bits.

The problem -here- is a mismatch between the C++ specs (int main()) and the way the shell use it. But it does not depend on the program.

The assignment itself is a trap.

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I could finally get an answer to this problem from my Tutor. –  Michi Kampl Sep 19 '13 at 9:42
    
it was a missunderstanding. it doesnt work to return real negative values and the test system will accept 253 as return value. thank you all for your help! –  Michi Kampl Sep 19 '13 at 9:44
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From C++11 standard 18.5/8:

If status is zero or EXIT_SUCCESS, an implementation-defined form of the status successful termination is returned. If status is EXIT_FAILURE, an implementation-defined form of the status unsuccessful termination is returned. Otherwise the status returned is implementation-defined.

Thus is it completely compliant that you get different results for different platforms, and/or compilers.

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1  
Your first sentence is in contradiction with the quoted section from the standard. The latter states that the return value is always implementation defined, while your introductory sentence suggests that sometimes it isn't. –  IInspectable Sep 19 '13 at 9:44
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Unix, and linux are limited to 8 bit return codes, -2 is 0xfe. Which your shell will understand to be 254 when you echo $?

You're expected to give a return code between 0 and 255.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exit_status

on POSIX-compatible exit statuses are restricted to values 0-255, the range of an unsigned 8-bit integer.

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1  
2s complement of -2 for an 8-bit value is 0xfe. Not sure what you're trying to say here... –  IInspectable Sep 19 '13 at 9:26
    
doesn't work unfortunately –  Michi Kampl Sep 19 '13 at 9:27
    
it makes no difference if i type -2 and let the system do the work to convert it to 254 or just type 254 or 0xfe... –  Michi Kampl Sep 19 '13 at 9:29
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