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    #include <stdio.h>
    # include <string.h>
    # include  <stdlib.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    int main()
    {

    int opt;
    char *name1,*name2 ;
    char *word[3];
    word[0] = malloc(sizeof(char)*5);
    strcpy(word[0],"file");
    strcat(word[0],"\0");
    word[1] = malloc(sizeof(char)*5);
    strcpy(word[1],"-aram");
    strcat(word[1],"\0");
    word[2] = malloc(sizeof(char)*5);
    strcpy(word[2],"-braj");
    strcat(word[2],"\0");

    char **words;

    words = word;
    while((opt = getopt(3,words,"a:b:"))!= -1)
    {
    switch(opt)
    {
        case 'a':
        name1 = optarg;
        break;
        case 'b' :
        name2 = optarg;
        break;

    }
    }


    printf("a %s b %s \n",name1,name2);
    return 0;
    }

the above code is working fine but when i made the assigning of arguments to word in >separate function function1 and passed the pointer word to another double pointer words >and passed this pointer to getopt function it is crashing with segfault.

please see below code which is not working .The program is giving Segmentation fault at >getopt.

    #include <stdio.h>
    # include <string.h>
    # include  <stdlib.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    char ** function1()
    {
        char *word[3];
        word[0] = malloc(sizeof(char)*5);
        strcpy(word[0],"file");
        strcat(word[0],"\0");
        word[1] = malloc(sizeof(char)*5);
        strcpy(word[1],"-aram");
        strcat(word[1],"\0");
        word[2] = malloc(sizeof(char)*5);
        strcpy(word[2],"-braj");
        strcat(word[2],"\0");

    return word;


    }

    int main()
    {

        int opt;
        char *name1,*name2 ;
       char **words = function1();
       while((opt = getopt(3,words,"a:b:"))!= -1)
       {
       switch(opt)
       {
           case 'a':
           name1 = optarg;
           break;
           case 'b' :
           name2 = optarg;
           break;
           default:
           break;

    }
    }

    printf("a %s b %s \n",name1,name2);
    return 0;
 }

Please see below debugging output from gdb which shows the word and words are same.

(gdb) print word $1 = {0x804a008 "file", 0x804a018 "-aram", 0x804a028 "-braj"} (gdb) s 21 } (gdb) s

Breakpoint 2, main () at test_getopt.c:30 30 while((opt = getopt(3,words,"a:b:"))!= -1) (gdb) print words $2 = (char **) 0xffffb124 (gdb) print words[0] $3 = 0x804a008 "file" (gdb) print words[1] $4 = 0x804a018 "-aram" (gdb) print words[2] $5 = 0x804a028 "-braj"

Some one please tell me what makes the difference when we get the arguments pointer >from another function and pass it to getopt.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

You have lots of undefined behaviors in your code.

For example, the string "-braj" is six characters, as it includes the terminating '\0' as well, so when you to strcpy you write beyond the allocated memory. Oh and by the way, strcpy adds the terminator, no need to add it manually. And there is no need to allocate these strings on the heap, just use pointers will be enough. And talking about the heap allocations, you are forgetting to free them. Not a big deal in this case, but may be if you use this in other programs.

To continue, the argument array must contain an extra terminator element, that is pointing to NULL.

And in the second version, where you create this array in a function, you're returning a pointer to this array which will not work, as local variables are not valid once leaving the scope they are declared in.

Instead, just before the call to getopt just declare it as this:

char *words[] = {
    "file",
    "-aram",
    "-braj",
    NULL
};
share|improve this answer
    
i know that passing this to getopt will work. But i just wondering when we have this code in another function function1 and return this words like, char **words = function(); if we pass the words to getopt i am getting segmentation fault. char ** function1() { char *word[] = {"file","-aram","-braj", NULL}; return word; } –  Ram Sekhar Sep 19 '13 at 10:17
    
@RamSekhar You get segmentation fault because you return a pointer to a local variable. Once a function returns, all local variables in its scope are lost, including arrays. Dereferencing the returned pointer is undefined behavior which may (or may not) crash the program. –  Joachim Pileborg Sep 19 '13 at 10:31

Reason of segfault is pointer and array are not same. Returning array name is not returning whole array it is just a address of its first element. In first case word is well known as array but in second case word which is returned from function_1 is just a pointer.

For better understanding refer Arrays and Pointers.

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