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I am solving the following problem from Codility:

A small frog wants to get to the other side of a river. The frog is currently located at position 0, and wants to get to position X. Leaves fall from a tree onto the surface of the river. You are given a non-empty zero-indexed array A consisting of N integers representing the falling leaves. A[K] represents the position where one leaf falls at time K, measured in minutes. The goal is to find the earliest time when the frog can jump to the other side of the river. The frog can cross only when leaves appear at every position across the river from 1 to X.

I used the following solution but only got a score of 81:

The code is in C#.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

class Solution {
    public int solution(int X, int[] A) {
        bool[] tiles = new bool[X];

        for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
        {
            tiles[A[i] - 1] = true;

            bool complete = true;

            for (int j = 0; j < tiles.Length; j++)
            {
                if (!tiles[j])
                {
                    complete = false;
                    break;
                }
            }

            if (complete)
                return i;
        }

        return -1;
    }
}

My algorithm runs at O(NX). What could be a better algorithm that will only require O(N)?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Change your code to something like this:

public int solution(int X, int[] A) 
{
    bool[] tiles = new bool[X];
    int todo = X;

    for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
    {
        int internalIndex = A[i] - 1;
        if (!tiles[internalIndex])
        {
            todo--;
            tiles[internalIndex] = true;
        }

        if (todo == 0)
            return i;
    }

    return -1;
}

This algorithm only requires O(A.length) time, since it always keeps track of how many "holes" we still have to fill with leaves.

How is this done here?

todo is the number of leaves still required to build the "bridge" of leaves. Whenever a leaf falls down, we first check whether there not already is a leaf at the position it falls down. If not, we decrement todo, fill the hole and go on. As soon as todo reaches 0, the entire river is covered ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I knew there is a better solution than mine, I just can't think outside of the box. –  Rue Leonheart Sep 19 '13 at 9:40
    
You're most welcome! –  olydis Sep 19 '13 at 9:43

whilst i agree you get a score of 100 it does not satisfy all test cases

for the sample data of 1, 3, 1, 4, 2, 3, 5, 4

if you try and find 3 it should return 5 but the answer given throws an exception

a corrected version is, as the leaf failing at position 2 is fulfilled after the forth minute

    public int solution(int X, int[] A)
    {
                int steps = -1;
        bool[] tiles = new bool[X];

        int todo = X;
        for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
        {
            steps += 1;
            int internalIndex = A[i] - 1;
            if (internalIndex < tiles.Length)
            {
                if (!tiles[internalIndex])
                {

                    todo--;

                    tiles[internalIndex] = true;

                }
            }
            if (todo == 0)

                return steps;
        }
        return -1;
    }
share|improve this answer

This gets me 100/100

public int solution(int X, int[] A)
{
    int z = -1;

    long combA = ((long) X)*(((long) X) + 1)/2;
    long sumA = 0;

    int[] countA = new int[X];

    for (int i = 0; i < A.Length; i++)
    {
        countA[A[i] - 1] += 1;

        if (countA[A[i] - 1] > 1)
        {
            countA[A[i] - 1] = 1;
        }
        else
        {
            sumA += A[i];
        }


        if (sumA == combA)
        {
            z = i;
            break;
        }

    }

    return z;
}
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100% Score : PHP code for FrogRiverOne : Ajeet Singh

function solution($X, $A) {
    for ($i = 0; $i < count($A); $i++){        
        if (!isset($position_achieved[$A[$i]])){
            $X--;   // reduce X by one position is achieved
            $position_achieved[$A[$i]] = true;
        }
        if (!$X){
            return $i;
        }
    }
    return -1;    
}
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Here's a Python solution I came up with (100/100 on Codility):

def solution(X, A):
    N = len(A)
    count = [0] * (X+1)
    steps = 0
    for k in xrange(N):
        if not count[A[k]]:
            count[A[k]] = 1
            steps += 1
            if steps == X:
                return k
    return -1
share|improve this answer

Here is an easy C++ solution:

int solution(int X, vector<int> &A)
{
  vector<bool> removed( X );

  for( size_t i = 0; i < A.size(); i++ )
  {
    if( removed[ A[i] - 1 ] == false )
    {
      removed[ A[i] - 1 ] = true; 
      X--;

      if(X == 0)
      {
        return i;
      } 
    }
  }

  return -1; 
}
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Ruby solution (100/100 on Codility):

def solution(x, a)

  check_array = (0..a.length).to_a
  check_array.each { |i| check_array[i]=0 }

  a.each_with_index do |element, i|

      if (check_array[element]==0)
          check_array[element]=1
          x -= 1
      end

      return i if (x==0)
  end

  return -1

end
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I happened upon this exercise a bit late. I see a lot of languages covered except C90. Like many I did find a solution by creating a secondary array. I used typical calloc and then free. My first solution is similar to others posted:

int solution(int X, int A[], int N)
{
    int *n = calloc(X, sizeof(*A));
    int index;

    for (index = 0; index < N; index++) {
        if (n[A[index] - 1] == 0) {
            n[A[index] - 1] = 1;
            if (--X == 0) {
                free(n);
                return index;
            }
        }
    }

    free(n);
    return -1;
}

I realized that I could get away without the second array altogether since we are dealing with signed integers and the codility site also says Elements of input arrays can be modified . It also says each element of array A is an integer within the range [1..X] . Since the original input array A will always have positive numbers I can use that to my advantage. I can use the sign bit of the ints in the array int A[] to denote whether I have seen a particular leaf position already (or not). The new version of the code uses the function abs to deal with the absolute value in each array element for indexing purposes. I set the sign bit to indicate I have visited a particular leaf position already, and I check the actual value at an index without using abs to know if I have visited the position already. My final solution looked like:

int solution(int X, int A[], int N)
{

    int index;
    int leaftimeidx;

    for (index = 0; index < N; index++) {
        leaftimeidx = abs(A[index]) - 1;

        if (A[leaftimeidx] > 0) {
            A[leaftimeidx] *= -1;

            if (--X == 0)
                return index;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

Both variants of my solution passed all the tests.

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here is my solution in C99, probably not the most elegant. but i hope is readable and understandable. here is the link to my test. https://codility.com/demo/results/demoNGRG5B-GMR/

int solution(int X, int A[], int N) {

    if (X <= 1) return 0; //if we only need to go 1 step we are already there
    if (N == 0) return -1;//if we don't have timing we can't predict 

    int B[X+1];

    for (int i=0; i <= X; i++) {
        B[i] = -1; //i set default value to -1 so i can see later if we missed a step. 
    }

    for (int i=0; i < N; i++) {
        if (A[i] <= X && (B[A[i]] == -1 || B[A[i]] > i)) B[A[i]] = i; //prepare my second array here with timing data 
    }

    int max_min = 0; //store the highest timing later on.

    for (int i=1; i <= X; i++) {
        if (B[i] == -1) return -1; //if we have any elements with -1 then we didn't cross the river
        if (max_min < B[i]) max_min = B[i]; //keep setting the highest timing seen the steps.
    }

    return max_min;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the comparisons i<=X in for (int i=0; i <= X; i++) after int B[X]; is a bug. That would exceed the array bounds by one overrunning the array of integers in B. Later on you use array based indexing starting at 1 which will access one integer beyond the edge of the array as well. –  Michael Petch Oct 25 at 0:28
    
@MichaelPetch thanks for pointing out the error. for some reason it didn't error out in codility, any idea why that would be? –  DevZer0 Oct 25 at 15:48
    
Since it is a buffer overrun, I can only assume that when they compile and run the application they don't do any types of runtime memory checks. I know that they don't even detect memory leaks. It is likely your program works because the buffer overrun in your case is not catastrophic and the program can continue. But it is still a bug nonetheless, just not one that codility sees. –  Michael Petch Oct 25 at 16:25
    
@MichaelPetch thanks, i fixed it. –  DevZer0 Oct 26 at 4:59

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