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I'm new to C++ and I have the ambition to understand how templates work. So I have implemented a generic list MyList which may contain both built-in primitive types and pointers. In the remove function I want to distinguish pointer types and built-ins so I can delete the object behind the pointer but leave the built-ins untouched.

To distinguish the template types, which can be pointers or non-pointers, I wrote the following functions, which work fine:

// distinguish between pointer and non-pointer type of template variable
template<typename T> bool is_pointer(T t) {
    return false;
}

template<typename T> bool is_pointer(T* t) {
    return true;
}

In the list function remove the idea was to test for pointers and delete them in case. However, the delete statement does not compile:

template<typename T> void MyList<T>::remove() {
    ...
    if (is_pointer(temp->getContent())) {
        // delete object pointer points to
        T t = temp->getContent();
        cout << t;    // prints out address
        // delete t;  // produces compiler error (see below)
}

In the main.cpp I test the list class with various types, I call amongst others:

MyList<int> mylist;                // with type int
mylist.remove();
mylist.add(3);
// add and remove elements

MyList<string> mylist2;           // with type string
...

MyList<string*> mylist3;          // with type string*
mylist.add(new string("three")); 
mylist.remove();

When I comment out the statement delete t; I can verify that the control flow is correct: the if-statement is only entered for the string* example. However, if I uncomment the delete statement the compiler complains like that:

../mylist.h: In member function ‘void MyList<T>::remove() [with T = int]’:
../main.cpp:36:18:   instantiated from here
../mylist.h:124:6: error: type ‘int’ argument given to ‘delete’, expected pointer
../mylist.h: In member function ‘void MyList<T>::remove() [with T = std::basic_string<char>]’:
../main.cpp:71:18:   instantiated from here
../mylist.h:124:6: error: type ‘struct std::basic_string<char>’ argument given to ‘delete’, expected pointer
make: *** [main.o] Error 1

What is it that I don't see? I'm using the delete statement on pointers only but still I get these compiler errors. If I print out t in the if-statement it is a pointer address!

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1  
T t is not a pointer, what does getContent() return? Also, you are using the void* overload for operator<< which is why you are seeing the address. –  Jesse Good Sep 19 '13 at 9:46
1  
Of course, you can't delete non-pointer types (that have no implicit conversion to an object pointer type). You can use a function destroy that has overloads for pointer and non-pointer types just like your is_pointer. –  dyp Sep 19 '13 at 9:47
1  
T t is not a pointer, so you cant delete it –  shobi Sep 19 '13 at 9:48
    
(However, ) It might not be a good idea to store raw pointers and delete them later on, as you can easily form pointers to variables of automatic, static (or thread) storage duration. Just provide the non-pointer version and let the users use smart pointers instead. –  dyp Sep 19 '13 at 9:48
1  
Do you expect if (false) delete 42; to compile? That's essentially what you have. –  Henrik Sep 19 '13 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A template is a blueprint that the compiler uses to actually create types based on the use of the blueprint. When you use you template with int and string* the compiler will actually create two variations of MyList, replacing T with the actual type. The implementation that uses int for T is bogus, because deleting an int does not make sense. The actual code the compiler generates is

int t = temp->getContent();
cout << t;
delete t;

This is incorrect, as you could figure out.

share|improve this answer
    
I see, so it's not the compilation with the string* pointer that causes the compiler to complain but the compilation with the int and string types –  Thomas789 Sep 19 '13 at 9:57
1  
@DyP So what I could use would be two destroy functions along the lines of the is_pointer functions with one that does nothing in case of built-ins and another that calls delete in case of pointers. –  Thomas789 Sep 19 '13 at 10:02
    
@Thomas789 Exactly, though, as I wrote in another comment, it might be best not do distinguish between them but rather let the user of the class use smart pointers instead. This also allows them to create MyLists of unmanaged raw pointers (for objects that are managed elsewhere). –  dyp Sep 19 '13 at 10:19
    
@DyP I don't quite understand. The users should create smart pointers of the raw pointers but should supply the raw pointers to the list? But if the smart pointers are out of scope the objects will be deleted although the list still contains pointers to them? –  Thomas789 Sep 19 '13 at 10:28
1  
@Thomas789 What I meant was that the users should have the choice to either use MyList<smart_ptr<some_type>> if MyList is to "manage" the lifetime of the stored some_type objects, and MyList<some_type*> if MyList shall not manage the lifetime of the pointed-to objects. –  dyp Sep 19 '13 at 10:31

If you instantiate the template with T = int, you get:

void MyList::remove() {
    if (false) {
        T t = temp->getContent();
        cout << t;
        delete t;
    }
}

Even if the code block is never executed, it must be syntactically correct.

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I suggest to use C++ 11 type_traits and auto_ptr like this

#include <type_traits>
template<typename T> void MyList<T>::remove() {
    ...
    if (is_pointer(T)) {
        // delete object pointer points to
        T t = temp->getContent();
        cout << t;    // prints out address
        auto_ptr tempobj(T);
}

Also look at this Determine if Type is a pointer in a template function that could be useful incase your compiler is not C++ 11 compliant.

Thanks Niraj Rathi

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2  
Doesn't help, the code will still be compiled for all instantiations. You'd need enable_if or something to prevent it from compiling invalid expressions. –  Angew Sep 19 '13 at 10:07
    
Angew is right, but thanks anyway, it's a good idea for me to switch to C++11 –  Thomas789 Sep 19 '13 at 10:15
    
edited to use auto_ptr so now delete will happen inside auto_ptr. –  anonymous Sep 19 '13 at 10:15
    
isn't auto_ptr deprecated in c++11? –  BЈовић Sep 19 '13 at 10:31
    
Yes, but more importantly, it would need a type argument. And that can't be auto_ptr<T>, because that would declare a smart pointer to a pointer. (since we're thinking about the case where T itself is a pointer) –  MSalters Sep 19 '13 at 11:16

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