Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Python 2.7 using numpy or by any means if I had an array of any size and wanted to excluded certain values and output the new array how would I do that? Here is What I would like

[(1,2,3),                                        
 (4,5,6), then exclude [4,2,9] to make the array[(1,5,3),
 (7,8,9)]                                        (7,8,6)]

I would always be excluding data the same length as the row length and always only one entry per column. [(1,5,3)] would be another example of data I would want to excluded. So every time I loop the function it reduces the array row size by one. I would imagine I have to use a masked array or convert my mask to a masked array and subtract the two then maybe condense the output but I have no idea how. Thanks for your time.

share|improve this question
    
Alfe actually gave me exactly what I was looking for. Thank you very much guys I learned quite a bit! –  user2785334 Sep 19 '13 at 21:55
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To exclude vector e from matrix a:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([(1,2,3), (4,5,6), (7,8,9)])
e = [4,2,9]
print np.array([ [ i for i in a.transpose()[j] if i != e[j] ]
    for j in range(len(e)) ]).transpose()
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can do it very efficiently if you transform your 2-D array in an unraveled 1-D array. Then you repeat the array with the elements to be excluded, called e in order to do an element-wise comparison:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([[1, 2, 3],
              [4, 5, 6],
              [7, 8, 9]])
e = [1, 5, 3]    

ar = a.T.ravel()
er = np.repeat(e, a.shape[0])

ans = ar[er != ar].reshape(a.shape[1], a.shape[0]-1).T

But it will work if each element in e only matches one row of a.


EDIT: as suggested by @Jaime, you can avoid the ravel() and get the same result doing directly:

ans = a.T[(a != e).T].reshape(a.shape[1], a.shape[0]-1).T
share|improve this answer
1  
Won't broadcasting work its magic if you skip the unraveling and repeating and simply do ans = a[a != e].reshape(a.shape[0]-1, a.shape[1])? Nice approach, anyway. –  Jaime Sep 19 '13 at 13:09
    
@Jaime Thank you! I tested here and it works.... I will update the answer... –  Saullo Castro Sep 19 '13 at 13:18
    
@Jaime, nope. Try it -- the order gets garbled. The magic of broadcasting goes only so far! In this case, the irregularity of positions to be removed means that column lengths don't get preserved if you do it this way. –  senderle Sep 19 '13 at 13:18
    
@SaulloCastro, strange, I tested it and it didn't work. I'll be interested to see what we did differently... –  senderle Sep 19 '13 at 13:19
    
@senderle I've updated the answer... so you can check my approach –  Saullo Castro Sep 19 '13 at 13:22
show 7 more comments

This would take some work to generalize, but here's something that can handle 2-d cases of the kind you describe. If passed unexpected input, this won't notice and will generate strange results, but it's at least a starting point:

def columnwise_compress(a, values):
    a_shape = a.shape
    a_trans_flat = a.transpose().reshape(-1)
    compressed = a_trans_flat[~numpy.in1d(a_trans_flat, values)]
    return compressed.reshape(a_shape[:-1] + ((a_shape[0] - 1),)).transpose()

Tested:

>>> columnwise_compress(numpy.arange(9).reshape(3, 3) + 1, [4, 2, 9])
array([[1, 5, 3],
       [7, 8, 6]])
>>> columnwise_compress(numpy.arange(9).reshape(3, 3) + 1, [1, 5, 3])
array([[4, 2, 6],
       [7, 8, 9]])

The difficulty is that you're asking for "compression" of a kind that numpy.compress doesn't do (removing different values for each column or row) and you're asking for compression along columns instead of rows. Compressing along rows is easier because it moves along the natural order of the values in memory; you might consider working with transposed arrays for that reason. If you want to do that, things become a bit simpler:

>>> a = numpy. array([[1, 4, 7],
...                   [2, 5, 8],
...                   [3, 6, 9]])
>>> a[~numpy.in1d(a, [4, 2, 9]).reshape(3, 3)].reshape(3, 2)
array([[1, 7],
       [5, 8],
       [3, 6]])

You'll still need to handle shape parameters intelligently if you do it this way, but it will still be simpler. Also, this assumes there are no duplicates in the original array; if there are, this could generate wrong results. Saullo's excellent answer partially avoids the problem, but any value-based approach isn't guaranteed to work unless you're certain that there aren't duplicate values in the columns.

share|improve this answer
add comment

In the spirit of @SaulloCastro's answer, but handling multiple occurrences of items, you can remove the first occurrence on each column doing the following:

def delete_skew_row(a, b) :
    rows, cols = a.shape
    row_to_remove = np.argmax(a == b, axis=0)
    items_to_remove = np.ravel_multi_index((row_to_remove,
                                            np.arange(cols)),
                                           a.shape, order='F')
    ret = np.delete(a.T, items_to_remove)
    return np.ascontiguousarray(ret.reshape(cols,rows-1).T)

rows, cols = 5, 10
a = np.random.randint(100, size=(rows, cols))
b = np.random.randint(rows, size=(cols,))
b = a[b, np.arange(cols)]

>>> a
array([[50, 46, 85, 82, 27, 41, 45, 27, 17, 26],
       [92, 35, 14, 34, 48, 27, 63, 58, 14, 18],
       [90, 91, 39, 19, 90, 29, 67, 52, 68, 69],
       [10, 99, 33, 58, 46, 71, 43, 23, 58, 49],
       [92, 81, 64, 77, 61, 99, 40, 49, 49, 87]])
>>> b
array([92, 81, 14, 82, 46, 29, 67, 58, 14, 69])
>>> delete_skew_row(a, b)
array([[50, 46, 85, 34, 27, 41, 45, 27, 17, 26],
       [90, 35, 39, 19, 48, 27, 63, 52, 68, 18],
       [10, 91, 33, 58, 90, 71, 43, 23, 58, 49],
       [92, 99, 64, 77, 61, 99, 40, 49, 49, 87]])
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.