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In Scala, how does one define a local parameter in the primary constructor of a class that is not a data member and that, for example, serves only to initialize a data member in the base class?

For example, in the following code, how could I properly define parameter b in the primary constructor of class B so that it generates only a temporary local parameter and not a data member?

class A(var a: Int)
class B(?b?) extends A(b)

Randall, your answers explain why the Scala compiler complains when I introduce a method inc that increments the property a, but also change the name of the parameter in the class B constructor to match that of the parameter in the class A constructor:

class A(var a: Int)
class B(a: Int) extends A(a) {
  def inc(value: Int) { this.a += value }
}

Scala compiler output:

$ scala construct.scala
construct.scala:3: error: reassignment to val
  def inc(value: Int) { this.a += value }
                               ^
one error found

Scala complains because class B must now have a private, read-only property a due to the reference to a in inc. Changing B(a: Int) to B(var a: Int) generates a different compiler error:

construct.scala:2: error: error overriding variable a in class A of type Int;
 variable a needs `override' modifier
class B(var a: Int) extends A(a) {
            ^
one error found

Adding override doesn't help, either:

construct.scala:2: error: error overriding variable a in class A of type Int;
 variable a cannot override a mutable variable
class B(override var a: Int) extends A(a) {
                 ^
one error found

How can I use the same name in the parameter in the primary constructor of B as the property defined in the primary constructor of the base class A?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you remove the "var" or "val" keyword from the constructor parameter, it does not produce a property.

Be aware, though, that non-var, non-val constructor parameters are in-scope and accessible throughout the class. If you use one in non-constructor code (i.e., in the body of a method), there will be an invisible private field in the generated class that holds that constructor parameter, just as if you made it a "private var" or "private val" constructor parameter.

Addendum (better late than never??):

In this code the references to the constructor parameter occur only in the constructor body:

class C1(i: Int) {
  val iSquared = i * i
  val iCubed = iSquared * i
  val iEven = i - i % 2
}

... Here the value i exists only during the execution of the constructor.

However, in the following code, because the constructor parameter is referenced in a method body—which is not part of the constructor body—the constructor parameter must be copied to a (private) field of the generated class (increasing its memory requirement by the 4 bytes required to hold an Int):

class C2(i: Int) {
  val iSquared = i * i
  val iCubed = iSquared * i
  val iEven = i - i % 2

  def mod(d: Int) = i % d
}
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Randall, thank you for your answer. Can you please provide an example of your caveat? –  Derek Mahar Dec 11 '09 at 17:49
    
So it is not possible to have a parameter to the constructor without having that parameter become an attribute for the instance? I have a class that receives a boolean, and the initialization varies according to the boolean value, but I do not need the boolean value after the constructor ends. Still, instances of this class will all have an extra attribute (the aforementioned boolean) taking up memory, even when not needed beyond initialization. That certainly sucks, for a language as great as Scala. Sad :( –  Ernesto Dec 2 '14 at 19:46
1  
@Ernesto, yes, as Randall explained in his addendum, it is possible to have a local constructor parameter, provided no method in the class refers to that parameter. In the case where such a method exists, Scala "promotes" the parameter to an instance data member. –  Derek Mahar Dec 3 '14 at 21:26
1  
Well, this explains a lot. Apparently I did not read the answer correctly, as it is now clear to me. The feature is a bit hidden though. I wish it wouldn't promote anything, and raise a compilation error. After all, if you really want the parameter to become an attribute, you can always prepend it with val or var. It would be clearer that way. –  Ernesto Dec 4 '14 at 13:38

After some experimentation, I determined that simply leaving out var or val in front of the parameter b will make it a local parameter and not a data member:

class A(var a: Int)
class B(b: Int) extends A(b)

Java expansion:

$ javap -private B
Compiled from "construct.scala"
public class B extends A implements scala.ScalaObject{
    public B(int);
}

$ javap -private A
Compiled from "construct.scala"
public class A extends java.lang.Object implements scala.ScalaObject{
    private int a;
    public A(int);
    public void a_$eq(int);
    public int a();
    public int $tag()       throws java.rmi.RemoteException;
}

Notice that class A has a private data member a due to the var a: Int in its primary constructor. Class B, however, has no data members, but its primary constructor still has a single integer parameter.

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It seems that if you make B a case class, b will be made a data member. Any idea why? –  Roar Skullestad May 2 '12 at 23:07
    
I did some experimentation as well, and I arrived to the opposite conclusion. Even when not prefixing the parameter with val or var, it is still kept beyond the constructor/initialization phase of the instance. Otherwise, how do your explain that this code compiles and run? (gist.github.com/gnapse/96387a056f0cf45dac7a) Notice how the fake constructor parameter is accessible inside the output instance method. –  Ernesto Dec 2 '14 at 19:49
    
@Ernesto, what version of the Scala compiler did you use? I ran this test almost five years ago probably using the latest version at the time. The behaviour may have since changed. –  Derek Mahar Dec 3 '14 at 21:21
    
Yeah, I now realize that this thread is from 2009. If that's the case, then it's a pity that things were ok back then, and are now wrong. It's inconceivable that Scala does not allow to have constructor parameters that are not meant to become attributes. (The Scala version I'm using is 2.11.4). –  Ernesto Dec 4 '14 at 13:34

You can create temporary variables throughout the initialization of single class members like this:

class A(b:Int){
  val m = {
    val tmp = b*b
    tmp+tmp
  }
}
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So m is a property that an instance of class A initializes to 2*b*b? –  Derek Mahar Dec 14 '09 at 20:49
    
Exactly. You can also wrap something in curly brackets inside the constructor. Maybe locals instantiated there will also not be created as class members. –  ziggystar Dec 15 '09 at 8:58

Derek,

If you have this:

class A(a: Int) {
  val aa = a // reference to constructor argument in constructor code (no problem)
  def m: Float = a.toFloat // reference to constructor argument in method body (causes a to be held in a field)
}

you'll find (using javap, e.g.) that a field named "a" is present in the class. If you comment out the "def m" you'll then see that the field is not created.

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