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What should I be calling the "BFactory" below. Its not really a Factory since there is no selection of a concrete class happening, and its not necessarily creating an object each time. Its kind of a Pool but the users do not return the Bs they get to the pool after they are done with them. It could be called a Cache but performance is not the primary intention. The intention is that everyone who is using the same BFactory will get the same B when they pass the same A which starts to sound kind of like a singleton-ish.

public class A
{
    public int MyProperty { get; set; }
}


public class B
{
    public B(A wrapped)
    {
        Wrapped = wrapped;
    }

    public A Wrapped { get; set; }
}

public class BFactory
{
    private Dictionary<A,B> _created = new Dictionary<A,B>();

    public B GetB(A a)
    {
        if (_created.ContainsKey(a) == false)
        {
            _created[a] = new B(a);
        }
        return _created[a];
    }
}

here is a slightly more real example:

The value from MyModel is shown in several locations in the app by binding a TextBlock to the ValueString property of MyViewModel. The user can select to present the value as a percent or a decimal and it should be updated in all locations if it is updated in one.

public class MyModel
{
    public int Value { get; set; }
}



public class MyViewModel
{
    private readonly MyModel _model;

    public MyViewModel(MyModel model)
    {
        _model = model;
    }

    public string ValueString 
    {
        get { return string.Format(FormatString, _model.Value); }
    }

    public string FormatString { get; set; }
}


public class MyViewModelFactory
{
    private readonly Dictionary<MyModel, MyViewModel> _created = new Dictionary<MyModel, MyViewModel>();

    public MyViewModel GetViewModel(MyModel model)
    {
        if (_created.ContainsKey(model) == false)
        {
            _created[model] = new MyViewModel(model);
        }
        return _created[model];
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
"Caching factory returning violation of law of demeter" – jgauffin Sep 19 '13 at 14:05
    
GetB method does not seem right. Shouldn't it get the existing value, if it exists? Using a mutable key, sounds like a bad idea. What is the problem that you are actually trying to solve with your singleton holders? – Sami Korhonen Sep 19 '13 at 14:17
    
Looks a little like an Identity Map to me. – David Osborne Sep 19 '13 at 15:53
    
Not sure how that violates the law of demeter. I added a more realistic example to show an example of the problem it can solve. – innominate227 Sep 19 '13 at 16:50
    
Looks like one hell of a memory leak to me :) I think you need a weak reference. – Lodewijk Bogaards Sep 19 '13 at 20:13

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