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Similar questions: One, Two, Three.

I am thoroughly flummoxed here. I'm using the loop-recur form, I'm using doall, and still I get a stack overflow for large loops. My Clojure version is 1.5.1.

Context: I'm training a neural net to mimic XOR. The function xor is the feed-forward function, taking weights and input and returning the result; the function b-xor is the back-propagation function that returns updated weights given the results of the last call to xor.

The following loop runs just fine, runs very fast, and returns a result, and based off of the results it returns, it is training the weights perfectly:

(loop [res 1        ; <- initial value doesn't matter
       weights xorw ; <- initial pseudo-random weights
       k 0]         ; <- count
  (if (= k 1000000)
      res
      (let [n (rand-int 4)
            r (doall (xor weights (first (nth xorset n))))]
        (recur (doall r)
               (doall (b-xor weights r (second (nth xorset n))))
               (inc k)))))

But of course, that only gives me the result of the very last run. Obviously I want to know what weights have been trained to get that result! The following loop, with nothing but the return value changed, overflows:

(loop [res 1
       weights xorw
       k 0]
  (if (= k 1000000)
      weights              ; <- new return value
      (let [n (rand-int 4)
            r (doall (xor weights (first (nth xorset n))))]
        (recur (doall r)
               (doall (b-xor weights r (second (nth xorset n))))
               (inc k)))))

This doesn't make sense to me. The entirety of weights gets used in each call to xor. So why could I use weights internally but not print it to the REPL?

And as you can see, I've stuck doall in all manner of places, more than I think I should need. XOR is a toy example, so weights and xorset are both very small. I believe the overflow occurs not from the execution of xor and b-xor, but when the REPL tries to print weights, for these two reasons:

(1) this loop can go up to 1500 without overflowing the stack.

(2) the time the loop runs is consistent with the length of the loop; that is, if I loop to 5000, it runs for half a second and then prints a stack overflow; if I loop to 1000000, it runs for ten seconds and then prints a stack overflow -- again, only if I print weights and not res at the end.

(3) EDIT: Also, if I just wrap the loop in (def w ... ), then there is no stack overflow. Attempting to peek at the resulting variable does, though.

user=> (clojure.stacktrace/e)
java.lang.StackOverflowError: null
 at clojure.core$seq.invoke (core.clj:133)
    clojure.core$map$fn__4211.invoke (core.clj:2490)
    clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:42)
    clojure.lang.LazySeq.seq (LazySeq.java:60)
    clojure.lang.RT.seq (RT.java:484)
    clojure.core$seq.invoke (core.clj:133)
    clojure.core$map$fn__4211.invoke (core.clj:2490)
    clojure.lang.LazySeq.sval (LazySeq.java:42)
nil

Where is the lazy sequence?

If you have suggestions for better ways to do this (this is just my on-the-fly REPL code), that'd be great, but I'm really looking for an explanation as to what is happening in this case.


EDIT 2: Definitely (?) a problem with the REPL.

This is bizarre. weights is a list containing six lists, four of which are empty. So far, so good. But trying to print one of these empty lists to the screen results in a stack overflow, but only the first time. The second time it prints without throwing any errors. Printing the non-empty lists produces no stack overflow. Now I can move on with my project, but...what on earth is going on here? Any ideas? (Please pardon the following ugliness, but I thought it might be helpful)

user=> (def ww (loop etc. etc. ))
#'user/ww
user=> (def x (first ww))
#'user/x
user=> x
StackOverflowError   clojure.lang.RT.seq (RT.java:484)
user=> x
()
user=> (def x (nth ww 3))
#'user/x
user=> x
(8.47089879874061 -8.742792338501289 -4.661609290853221)
user=> (def ww (loop etc. etc. ))
#'user/ww
user=> ww
StackOverflowError   clojure.core/seq (core.clj:133)
user=> ww
StackOverflowError   clojure.core/seq (core.clj:133)
user=> ww
StackOverflowError   clojure.core/seq (core.clj:133)
user=> ww
StackOverflowError   clojure.core/seq (core.clj:133)
user=> ww
(() () () (8.471553034351501 -8.741870954507117 -4.661171802683782) () (-8.861958958234174 8.828933147027938 18.43649480263751 -4.532462509591159))
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what is xorset? –  Kevin Sep 19 '13 at 15:06
    
(def xorset [[[0 0 1 1] [0]] [[0 1 1 1] [1]] [[1 0 1 1] [1]] [[1 1 1 1] [0]]]) –  galdre Sep 19 '13 at 15:07
    
and what does xor/b-xor return (is it a lazy sequence)? –  Kevin Sep 19 '13 at 15:12
    
I thought I had made that irrelevant by wrapping them in doall. But I just figured out (part of) the problem: doall is not recursive, and the lazy sequence returned by b-xor contained lazy subsequences. –  galdre Sep 19 '13 at 15:23
    
Thanks for taking time to look at this! –  galdre Sep 19 '13 at 15:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you call doall on a sequence that contains more lazy sequences, doall does not recursively iterate through the subsequences. In this particular case, the return value of b-xor contained empty lists that were defined lazily from previous empty lists defined lazily from previous empty lists, and so on. All I had to do was add a single doall to the map that produced the empty lists (in b-xor), and the problem disappeared. This loop (with all of the doall's removed) never overflows:

(loop [res 1
       weights xorw
       k 0]
  (if (= k 1000000)
      weights 
      (let [n (rand-int 4)
            r (xor weights (first (nth xorset n)))]
        (recur r
               (b-xor weights r (second (nth xorset n)))
               (inc k)))))

Okay. So I have an answer. I hope this is helpful to some other poor soul who thought he'd solved his lazy sequencing issues with a badly-placed doall.

This still leaves me with a question about the REPL, but it should probably go under a different question so it won't have all of the baggage of this problem with it. You can see in my question above that the empty lists were evaluated correctly. Why did printing them the first time throw an exception? I'm going to experiment a bit with this, and if I can't figure it out...new question!

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