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Say I want to test a method returning a bunch of items of the following type using fluent-assertions to ensure that all items have their IsActive-flag set to true:

public class Item
{
    public bool IsActive { get; set; }
}

To achieve that I could simply iterate over the collection and assert every item separately in a foreach-loop:

var items = CreateABunchOfActiveItems();
foreach (var item in items)
{
    item.IsActive.Should().BeTrue("because I said so!");
}

But is there a more fluent way to assert every item in the whole collection at once?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Perhaps something like this:

var items = CreateABunchOfActiveItems();
items.Select(x => x.IsActive.Should().BeTrue("because I said so!"))
     .All(x => true); 

Note that the last line (.All(x => true)) forces the previous Select to execute for each item.

Or even better:

var items = CreateABunchOfActiveItems();
items.Should().OnlyContain(x => x.IsActive, "because I said so!");

Or another solution you might like:

var items = CreateABunchOfActiveItems();
items.All(x => x.IsActive).Should().BeTrue("because I said so!");
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1  
I think a simple foreach-loop is cleaner and better readable than your first approach. But the second approach is the nice one I was looking for! –  Spontifixus Sep 19 '13 at 16:36
1  
@Spontifixus I agree the first was is bit of a hack, but it does allow you to do some things the second won't--e.g. specify a different reason for each item. But yeah, a foreach-loop would work just as well for that. –  p.s.w.g Sep 19 '13 at 16:38
    
Haha - the third one is a nice one, too - but I still like the second one better ;) –  Spontifixus Sep 19 '13 at 16:50
1  
I would also use the 2nd option because it will include the expression in the failure message. If you just use Should().BeTrue(), you end up with something like "Expected false, but found true". –  Dennis Doomen Sep 19 '13 at 18:28
    
Remember, the first one will ONLY work with the .All(). I didn't realize that in the first place - and searched quite a bit until I found out about OnlyContain(). This is very neat. –  Marcel Dec 27 '13 at 10:13

Something like replacing your foreach loop with a foreach method should do the trick (at least a little bit).

var items = CreateABunchOfActiveItems();
items.ForEach(item => item.IsActive.Should().BeTrue("because I said so, too!"));

I find this syntax a little bit more fluent than traditional foreach loop :)

ForEach method is not defined if your method CreateABunchOfActiveItems returns an IEnumerable. But it can be easily implemented as an extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> ForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumeration, 
    Action<T> action)
{
    // I use ToList() to force a copy, otherwise your action 
    // coud affect your original collection of items!. If you are confortable 
    // with that, you can ommit it
    foreach (T item in enumeration.ToList())
    {
        action(item);
        yield return item;
    }
}
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This is also a valid approach - And there are libraries providing the ForEach-extension. But I was mainly looking if there is a way to do this kind of natively with the fluent-assertion library. –  Spontifixus Sep 19 '13 at 16:44
1  
And also note, that ToList() already enumerates the original collection, which then gets enumerated once again by the foreach-loop... –  Spontifixus Sep 19 '13 at 16:46
    
Yes, I'm aware that it may not be the best approach when dealing with heavy operations (many items, db connections, filereading, etc.) but it suits me for my daily testing. –  Joel Sep 19 '13 at 17:13

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