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Perhaps my knowledge of inheritance and polymorphism isn't what I thought it was. Can anyone shed some light?

Setup (trivialization of problem):

class X {
};

class Y {
};

class Base {
  public:
    void f( X* ) {}
};

class Child: public Base {
  public:
    void f( Y* ) {}
};

Question: This should work, right?

int main( void ) {
  X* x = new X();
  Y* y = new Y();
  Child* c = new Child();
  c->f( x );
  c->f( y );
  return 0;
}

I get errors (GCC 4.4) to the tune of:

`no matching function for call to 'Child::f(X*&)'`
`note: candidates are: void Child::f(Y*)`
share|improve this question
11  
Name hiding. This question gets asked like 3 times a day. See the FAQ parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/strange-inheritance.html#faq-23.9 –  AndreyT Dec 11 '09 at 18:32
    
Did you mean for your two classes to be called A and B? –  Dave Dec 11 '09 at 18:33
    
Perhaps I'm misreading, but are you sure that the arguments to f should be A and B? –  tloach Dec 11 '09 at 18:33
    
His error message shows that he has no A and B in his real code. It is just a typo. I corrected the source. –  AndreyT Dec 11 '09 at 18:35
    
Thanks, @AndreyT - I had A, B, C, and D originally but it was too confusing. –  Chris Dec 11 '09 at 18:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The virtual keyword will not help you here.

Your base class Base::f is being hidden by your derived type. You need to do the following:

class Child: public Base {
  public:
    using Base::f;
    void f( Y* ) {}
};

Parashift goes into more detail.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, I didn't know you could do 'using' in a class like that - thanks. At any rate, I'm well familiar with the concept of name hiding - but is it really ONLY based upon function name, and not the entire signature? –  Chris Dec 11 '09 at 18:49
2  
Yes, the look-up by name happens before overload resolution, thus Base::f isn't considered for overloads without pulling them in explicitly. –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 11 '09 at 19:41
    
Okay, that makes sense. –  Chris Dec 11 '09 at 19:56

It was already answered at:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1628768/why-does-an-overridden-function-in-the-derived-class-hide-other-overloads-of-the

When you declare a method on a derived class, it hides any method with the same name from the base class.

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Your derived class' f() hides the base class' f(). You can prevent this by explicitly bringing Base::f() into the derived class' scope:

class Child: public Base {
  public:
    using Base::f;
    void f( Y* ) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Beat me by some seconds ;) –  Georg Fritzsche Dec 11 '09 at 18:39

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