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While I do understand the Gist of inter thread communication and the usage of wait and notify on the monitor to ensure Put/Get operations are synchronized - I'm trying to understand why we need the Thread.sleep() in the code below for both producer and consumer when we have a working wait/notify mechanism? If I remove the thread.sleep() - the output goes to hell!

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String argv[]) throws Throwable {

        Holder h = new Holder();
        Thread p = new Thread(new Producer(h), "Producer");
        Thread c = new Thread(new Consumer(h), "Consumer");
        p.start();
        c.start();
    }
}

class Holder {
    int a;
    volatile boolean hasPut;

    public synchronized void put(int i) {
        while (hasPut) {
            try {
                System.out.println("The thread " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + " Going ta sleep..."); 
                wait(1000);
            } catch(Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        this.a = i;
        hasPut = true;
        notifyAll();
    }

    public synchronized int get() {
        while (!hasPut) {
            try {
                System.out.println("The thread " + Thread.currentThread().getName() + " Going ta sleep..."); 
                wait(1000);
            } catch(Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        hasPut = false;
        notifyAll();
        return this.a;
    }
}

class Producer implements Runnable {
    Holder h;
    public Producer(Holder h) {
        this.h = h;
    }

    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            System.out.println("Putting : "+i); 
            h.put(i);
            try {
                Thread.sleep(10);
            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
            }
        }
    }
}

class Consumer implements Runnable {
    Holder h;
    public Consumer(Holder h) {
        this.h = h;
    }

    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            int k = h.get();
            System.out.println("Getting : "+k); 
            try {
                Thread.sleep(10);
            } catch (InterruptedException ie) {
            }
        }
    }
}
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3  
What's the problem you're seeing when you remove Thread.sleep()? I tried the code with and without the two calls to Thread.sleep(10), and I don't see a problem either way. –  Bron Sep 19 '13 at 17:27
    
It is a demo program that shows you what happens when a tread is waiting on the other, that is why the .sleep statements or in place. Compare running the code with them and not you see different results. Run them more than once you will see the results changes depending on the tread interaction. Run with and without other programs running also. –  Bit Sep 19 '13 at 18:10
    
@Bron - The sequence of GET/PUT was completely haphazard when i removed sleep- from one of the responders - it seems the console output is confusing - I guess keeping the workings of wait/notify I had expected P/G/P/G/P/G output to be honored without the Sleep() since we're accurately trying to control those two operations - but because I saw those outputs out of synch by removing just the Sleep() - it felt to my novice eyes that sleep() was perhaps playing a needed role ..since with it - the P/G/P/G.... sequence was precise! I didnt understand WHY thus the origin of the question –  user2796381 Sep 19 '13 at 18:30
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you get confused by the console output.

The important part is if every .get() in the consumer gets all the elements from the producer. When you remove all the confusing System.out. lines and just use

class Consumer implements Runnable {
    Holder h;
    public Consumer(Holder h) {
        this.h = h;
    }

    public void run() {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
            int k = h.get();
            if (k != i)
                System.out.println("Got wrong value " + k + "expected value " + i); 
        }
    }
}

You will see that your code works fine.

I think your confusion comes from outputs that looks like this

Getting : 990
Putting : 993
Getting : 991
Getting : 992
The thread Consumer Going ta sleep...
Getting : 993

But also you see all the gets are in the right order and all the puts too. So this is a problem of the way in which the output works in Java, when multiple threads are involved.

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Thanks Raphael - you're absolutely right - feel silly that this just ties down to the console output nuances - but Put-Get seems to be honored even though its not printing out right! Thank you! –  user2796381 Sep 19 '13 at 18:34
    
@user2796381 Yeah, I had once the same problem. It is a lesson we all have to learn. –  Raphael Ahrens Sep 19 '13 at 18:42
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One thread will read the data & the iteration may take more than the number of times the data fetched. Since all the threads concurrently access the data & processes it more than expected number of times, there should be Thread.sleep for certain milliseconds.

I faced the same issue, where after increasing thread.sleep() it read once & processed once

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