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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data%5Fcompression#Lossless%5Fdata%5Fcompression

For any given compression scheme, one can provide sample input that would result in no savings in space, right?

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Obviously. Examples include compressing already compressed data or random data streams. –  anon Dec 11 '09 at 19:12
    
Are you referring to general-purpose compression schemes, or abstractly speaking of any compression scheme in any domain? For the former: yes. For the latter, I would argue: no. –  Dave Mateer Dec 11 '09 at 19:14
    
general-purpose; I already thought about the "zipping a zip file" example. I was thinking about more straightforward questions of, "if I give you a stream of integers, can you compress them always?" –  Aaron Fi Dec 11 '09 at 19:17
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A zip file is a stream of integers. –  anon Dec 11 '09 at 19:19
    
Heh, good point. I should've just leapfrogged to the "bitstream" point of view. –  Aaron Fi Dec 11 '09 at 19:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, there's always something that will grow larger. The pigeonhole principle says that if you have a space of inputs, and a 1-to-1 function (the lossless compression), then the number of outputs has to be the same as the number of inputs.

If the inputs are files of N bits, then the number of inputs is 2**N, and the number of outputs is 2**N. You can't store that many different outputs in files all shorter than N bits.

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doesn't that imply all lossless compression is useless in general? –  Aaron Fi Dec 11 '09 at 19:15
    
Theoretically it's not necessary for anything to be larger. But we can guarantee that there are inputs that are at least as large. –  recursive Dec 11 '09 at 19:15
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Of course, if no input gets larger, then no input can get smaller either. –  Anon. Dec 11 '09 at 19:17
    
number of inputs would be 2**(8*N) inputs and outputs. (8 bits per byte.) –  retracile Dec 11 '09 at 19:19
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Not at all: they work really well on typical inputs. Just because a few files are larger doesn't mean that the average isn't much smaller. –  Ned Batchelder Dec 11 '09 at 19:22

For any given compression scheme, one can provide sample input that would result in no savings in space, right?

Yes: A single bit.

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The empty string would work as well. –  Mechanical snail Oct 10 '11 at 19:09

Absolutely.

If it wasn't, you could conceivably run the output of the compression into the compressor again ad infinium for better compression until you get all the way to a single bit. That's obviously impossible.

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Though it would be nice... –  Benoit Dec 11 '09 at 19:33

Correct. Try zipping a zip file ... if the data is already compressed, you won't be able to get further compression.

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"if I give you a stream of integers, can you compress them always?"

In the "zipping a zipfile" example, why are you thinking of bytes in the zipfile as something other than a stream of integers?

That was a pretty concise example of an instance when you could "defeat" lossless data compression.

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