Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a simple code snippet to produce a barplot, but the bars end up "spilling out" of the image. Google and a countless number of R forums haven't helped, so here's my last effort:

pdf(file="output.pdf", height=5, width=8)
par(las=1)
bar_colors  <- c("royalblue4", "gray")
subjects <- c("Comp. Sc.\n(17.2%)", "Physics\n(19.6%)", "Maths\n(29.4%)",
              "Pol. Sc.\n(40.4%)", "Psychology\n(69.8%)")
aVals <- c(52.36, 52.00, 55.43, 56.08, 62.89)
bVals <- c(53.57, 52.93, 56.07, 58.86, 63.87)
height <- rbind(aVals, bVals)
barplot(height, beside=T, axisnames=T, col=bar_colors, ylim=c(50,65),
xlab="Disciplines (% of women)", ylab = "Classification accuracy (%)",
names.arg=subjects)
legend("topleft", c("bVals", "bVals"), cex=1, fill=bar_colors)
# to produce pdf output
dev.off()

No matter what I do, the bars stay spilled over way below the x-axis (as shown here in a cropped screenshot). Any help is highly appreciated. Oh, another point: I am quite new to R, so please forgive me if there is some very basic mistake.

Here's the output (cropped from screenshot)

share|improve this question
1  
What are pos1grams and posfn1grams? Should it be aVals and bVals? –  Henrik Sep 19 '13 at 20:12
    
Oh yes! Sorry about that copy-paste inconsistency. And thank you for pointing it out. Corrected the mistake. –  Chthonic Project Sep 19 '13 at 20:15
    
Also, I just noticed that it is the introduction of ylim=c(50,65) that's causing this problem. –  Chthonic Project Sep 19 '13 at 20:18
1  
Yes. ylim=c(50,65) is causing a problem. You should not be constraining the value at the bottom. –  BondedDust Sep 19 '13 at 20:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Once I noticed that it is the addition of ylim=c(50,65) that causes the spill-over of the bars, finding the fix was relatively easy. Add xpd = FALSE when calling barplot().

Ref. https://stat.ethz.ch/pipermail/r-help/2005-February/066308.html

share|improve this answer

The graph presented was not drawn with the code presented but it's close. Changing xpd is a solution but I'd like to suggest another. Don't use a bar plot. Bar charts are supposed to start at 0. They're specifically for count data. They apply special meaning to all of the values in the bar as opposed to outside and cause values to be rated differently depending on the position of the bar. The reason R fails at doing what you want initially here is because it's trying to do the right thing and start at 0.

The following plot uses a heck of a lot less ink while making the comparison of aVals and bVals substantially easier. Some might not like a line connecting the points because the x-axis is categorical but if your prime goal is to make the comparison in Vals and the variables are very clearly categorical then this is OK as it emphasizes the point better. Furthermore, for such a simple graph now a legend is superfluous and one can directly label the lines.

(As an aside, I think it would be better to plot the male and female aVals and bVals for each discipline separately.)

par(las=1, bty = 'n')
point_colors  <- c("royalblue4", "gray")
subjects <- c("Comp. Sc.\n(17.2%)", "Physics\n(19.6%)", "Maths\n(29.4%)",
              "Pol. Sc.\n(40.4%)", "Psychology\n(69.8%)")
aVals <- c(52.36, 52.00, 55.43, 56.08, 62.89)
bVals <- c(53.57, 52.93, 56.07, 58.86, 63.87)
n <- length(aVals)
plot(1:n, aVals, ylim = c(50, 65), type = 'l', col=point_colors[1], xlab="Disciplines (% of women)", ylab = "Classification accuracy (%)", xaxt = 'n', panel.first = grid(nx = NA, ny = NULL))
lines(1:n, bVals, col = point_colors[2])
axis(1, 1:5, subjects, cex.axis = 0.85, tcl = -0.1)
text(c(3.25, 3.5), c(54, 59), c('aVals', 'bVals'))

enter image description here

You can build from there to visualize the data further. You've treated the disciplines categorically but you have information that makes them numeric variables. You're highlighting the proportion of women in the department. Why not make the x-graph conform to that scale? It might show something different in the data and make the lines connection something perhaps a little more meaningful. Try this.

par(las=1, bty = 'n')
point_colors  <- c("royalblue4", "gray")
subjects <- c("Comp. Sc.\n(17.2%)", "Physics\n(19.6%)", "Maths\n(29.4%)",
              "Pol. Sc.\n(40.4%)", "Psychology\n(69.8%)")
xpos <- c(17.2, 19.6, 29.4, 40.4, 69.8)
aVals <- c(52.36, 52.00, 55.43, 56.08, 62.89)
bVals <- c(53.57, 52.93, 56.07, 58.86, 63.87)
n <- length(aVals)
plot(xpos, aVals, ylim = c(50, 65), type = 'l', col=point_colors[1], xlab="Disciplines (% of women)", ylab = "Classification accuracy (%)", xaxt = 'n', panel.first = grid(nx = NA, ny = NULL))
lines(xpos, bVals, col = point_colors[2])
axis(1, xpos, subjects, cex.axis = 0.85, tcl = -0.1)
text(c(3.25, 3.5), c(54, 59), c('aVals', 'bVals'))

enter image description here

OK, admittedly we've lost physics, but that can be handled a bunch of ways. You could move the labels to below the % values and allow them to slide around a bit or use an arrow to point to the spot. I'll leave that up to you. What this seems to show is a more or less linear relationship. (although I doubt that's actually the case since proportions usually don't behave that way). Regardless, the only point I'm trying to make is that stepping outside of the barplot box is a good idea.

(You also might want to google "dynamite plot" and see lots of reasons why they're disliked)

share|improve this answer
1  
I disagree with not plotting "all the stuff at the bottom". It is a classic lying with data strategy to exegerate differences by failing to plot the full scale for 0 to a value on barplots. –  BondedDust Sep 19 '13 at 20:46
1  
So, in fields where a 0.5% increase in accuracy would matter, and the baseline accuracy is, say, 92.5% ... I should have a y-axis from 0 to 100 even if I only need to show something between 90% and 100%? From my experience, I have seen that experts in the field already know the significance of the differences shown in a graph. It is only the non-experts who think it's about "lying with data". –  Chthonic Project Sep 23 '13 at 12:23
    
@John : Thanks for the explanation in your answer. In this particular case, I need to stick to barplot, but I learned a neat trick based on your answer, and also, in future, this will help me decide between what kind of a graph I want to have in a presentation. –  Chthonic Project Sep 23 '13 at 12:27
    
Wanted to add another point about exaggerating differences. Usually, any presentation/thesis/etc. that reports an increase in classification accuracy, will require rigorous statistical significance tests to be accepted among the scientific community. Too many tests can get past this barrier too, but then, the exaggeration needs to pass a barrier like Bonferroni's test. So ... in the end ... data can't lie. Cheers :-) –  Chthonic Project Sep 23 '13 at 12:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.