Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to do as the title says. Here is my code:

school.each { |x| school[:students][x].merge!(semester:"Summer") }

I think I pinpointed the problem to the "[x]" above. If I substitute an array position such as "[2]" it works fine. How can make the iteration work?

If the info above is not enough or you'd like to offer a better solution, please see the details below. Thanks!


The error message I get:

file.rb:31:in []': no implicit conversion of Array into Integer (TypeError) from file.rb:31:inblock in ' from file.rb:31:in each' from file.rb:31:in'

The nested hash below before alteration:

school = { 
  :name => "Happy Funtime School",
  :location => "NYC",
  :instructors => [ 
    {:name=>"Blake", :subject=>"being awesome" },
    {:name=>"Ashley", :subject=>"being better than blake"},
    {:name=>"Jeff", :subject=>"karaoke"}
  ],
  :students => [ 
    {:name => "Marissa", :grade => "B"},
    {:name=>"Billy", :grade => "F"},
    {:name => "Frank", :grade => "A"},
    {:name => "Sophie", :grade => "C"}
  ]
}

I'm trying to append :semester=>"Summer" to each of the last four hashes. Here is what I'm trying to go for:

# ...preceding code is the same. Changed code below...
  :students => [ 
    {:name => "Marissa", :grade => "B", :semester => "Summer"},
    {:name=>"Billy", :grade => "F", :semester => "Summer"},
    {:name => "Frank", :grade => "A", :semester => "Summer"},
    {:name => "Sophie", :grade => "C", :semester => "Summer"}
  ]
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just iterate over the students:

school[:students].each { |student| student[:semester] = "Summer" }

Or, using merge:

school[:students].each { |student| student.merge!(semester: "Summer") }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's exactly what I was looking for! –  SamTalks Oct 4 '13 at 16:26

The issue is that when you do array.each {|x| do something}, x actually refers to each element in the array.

For example, in the first iteration of the loop,

x = {:name => "Marissa", :grade => "B"}

So what you are really doing is trying to reference:

school[:student][{:name => "Marissa", :grade => "B"}]

Which will not work

What you could do instead is create a for loop to track the index.

for i in 0 ... school[:student].count
    school[:students][i].merge!(semester:"Summer")
end

Edit: Stefan's solution is much better than mine, but I will leave this up to show where you went wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. All these are very helpful as I am currently a Ruby noob :) –  SamTalks Oct 4 '13 at 18:32

I would do as below using Hash#store :

require 'awesome_print'

school = {
                 :name => "Happy Funtime School",
             :location => "NYC",
          :instructors => [
                    {
                                 :name => "Blake",
                              :subject => "being awesome"
                    },
                    {
                                 :name => "Ashley",
                              :subject => "being better than blake"
                    },
                    {
                                 :name => "Jeff",
                              :subject => "karaoke"
                    }
          ],
             :students => [
                    {
                               :name => "Marissa",
                              :grade => "B"
                    },
                    {
                               :name => "Billy",
                              :grade => "F"
                    },
                    {
                               :name => "Frank",
                              :grade => "A"
                    },
                    {
                               :name => "Sophie",
                              :grade => "C"
                    }
          ]
}

school[:students].each{|h| h.store(:semester ,"Summer")}
ap school,:index => false,:indent => 10

output

{
                 :name => "Happy Funtime School",
             :location => "NYC",
          :instructors => [
                    {
                                 :name => "Blake",
                              :subject => "being awesome"
                    },
                    {
                                 :name => "Ashley",
                              :subject => "being better than blake"
                    },
                    {
                                 :name => "Jeff",
                              :subject => "karaoke"
                    }
          ],
             :students => [
                    {
                                  :name => "Marissa",
                                 :grade => "B",
                              :semester => "Summer"
                    },
                    {
                                  :name => "Billy",
                                 :grade => "F",
                              :semester => "Summer"
                    },
                    {
                                  :name => "Frank",
                                 :grade => "A",
                              :semester => "Summer"
                    },
                    {
                                  :name => "Sophie",
                                 :grade => "C",
                              :semester => "Summer"
                    }
          ]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. I wasn't familiar with the .store command. thanks! –  SamTalks Oct 4 '13 at 18:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.