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I'm parsing command line arguments within Tcl. The arguments were ok being out of order in comparison to the way they were declared in the parameters list (I'm actually invoking expect but it's only Tcl up to this point):

# cmdline package to handle arguments
package require cmdline

# set parameters
set parameters {
    {apk.arg                "" "apk file"}
    {apkdirfrom.arg         "" "apk from dir"}
    {apkdirto.arg           "" "apk to dir"}
    {pkg.arg                "" "package"}
    {mainclass.arg          "" "main class"}
    {monkey.arg             "" "monkeyrunner script"}
    {remotehost.arg         "" "remote host"}
    {remoteuser.arg         "" "remote user"}
    {logdir.arg             "" "log dir"}
    {timeout.arg            "" "timeout"}
    {disable-uninstall.arg  "" "unimplemented: disable uninstall. 0 disable is off, 1 disable is on."}
}

array set arg [cmdline::getoptions argv $parameters]

However, this order didn't work. I think I may have invoked them in a slightly different order than what is shown here. In fact, using Mac's Tcl and Window's Cygwin Tcl, that assumptions seems to be correct. However, using Ubuntu 12.04 Linux, this assumption proved to be incorrect. They needed to be in a specific order.

This is the order that worked:

# set parameters

set parameters {
    {apk.arg                "" "apk file"}
    {apkdirfrom.arg         "" "apk from dir"}
    {apkdirto.arg           "" "apk to dir"}
    {pkg.arg                "" "package"}
    {mainclass.arg          "" "main class"}
    {monkey.arg             "" "monkeyrunner script"}
    {remotehost.arg         "" "remote host"}
    {remoteuser.arg         "" "remote user"}
    {timeout.arg            "" "timeout"}
    {disable-uninstall.arg  "" "unimplemented"}
    {logdir.arg             "" "log dir"}
}

array set arg [cmdline::getKnownOptions argv $parameters]

That is, the log directory, seems to be ok when it comes last.

Do you know if order is suppose to matter? I thought that it didn't, but it appears that it does.

Anyways, on the mac I found out that we're using tcllib 1.12 and on Ubuntu 12.04 we're using tcllib 1.14. I tried to swap out cmdline libs, but that didn't work. I think on windows it works because I copied cmdline from the mac, and that just works.

If anyone could shed a little light on this problem, that would be helpful.

If you could recommend something a little more fool proof (an alternate command line parser), that would be great.

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I wonder if the hyphen in "disable-uninstall" is the issue. Try changing it to an underscore. –  glenn jackman Sep 19 '13 at 23:01
    
Those versions look old in all cases. Since it's a pure Tcl package, getting the current version and just using that directly would seem practical. –  Donal Fellows Sep 20 '13 at 13:28
    
I use the same code in another mac-only expect/tcl script. It only seems to show up on Ubuntu. I also installed the latest on Ubuntu using sudo apt-get install...still thanks for your replies. I will try to remove the hyphen. –  user2284423 Sep 23 '13 at 19:30
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1 Answer

As an alternative to cmdline, dict could work for your options handling (since all your arguments are options with values).

You set up the option list with default values like this:

set options [dict create \
    -apk                "" \
    -apkdirfrom         "" \
    -apkdirto           "" \
    -pkg                "" \
    -mainclass          "" \
    -monkey             "" \
    -remotehost         "" \
    -remoteuser         "" \
    -logdir             "" \
    -timeout            "" \
    -disable-uninstall  "" \
]

and a dictionary for usage documentation like this:

set optionsUsage [dict create \
    -apk                "apk file" \
    -apkdirfrom         "apk from dir" \
    -apkdirto           "apk to dir" \
    -pkg                "package" \
    -mainclass          "main class" \
    -monkey             "monkeyrunner script" \
    -remotehost         "remote host" \
    -remoteuser         "remote user" \
    -logdir             "log dir" \
    -timeout            "timeout" \
    -disable-uninstall  "unimplemented: disable uninstall. 0 disable is off, 1 disable is on." \
]

You can print a usage message with this command:

proc printUsage optionsUsage {
    set maxlen 0
    dict for {opt -} $optionsUsage {
        set len [string length $opt]
        if {$len > $maxlen} { set maxlen $len }
    }
    dict for {opt use} $optionsUsage {
        puts [format "%-${maxlen}s %s" $opt $use]
    }
}

And in your command, you set the actual options values like this:

set actualOptions [dict merge $::options $args]

(Well, if you want to go straight by the book, you do it like this:)

set actualOptions [dict merge $::options [dict create {*}$args]]

You query the options dictionary like this:

dict get $actualOptions -monkey

And you get the specific usage for an option like this:

dict get $::optionsUsage -monkey
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