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I'm new to Rails, and am trying to make a pet app. It has 3 attributes: name, hungry, and mood. I generated a scaffold and wrote a feed method into the model:

def feed
 self.hungry==false;
 save!
end

I want feed to be something a user can do in the edit view, so I created a checkbox to indicate feeding vs. not feeding. My plan was to call the feed function from the controller in the update function. Right now, it looks like this:

def update
respond_to do |format|
  if @pet.update(pet_params)
    format.html { redirect_to @pet, notice: 'Pet was successfully updated. #{params[:feed]}' }
    format.json { head :no_content }
  else
    format.html { render action: 'edit' }
    format.json { render json: @pet.errors, status: :unprocessable_entity }
  end
end
if @pet.update_attributes(params[:feed])
  @pet.feed
end 
end

I have an odd sense that I'm mixing metaphors here, but am not sure of the right course of action. I'm trying to call a function from my update function, and that doesn't seem to be working. It might have to do with the fact that "feed" isn't listed in my model's parameters, but I don't need it to be. I just need it to call a function. Help!

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1 Answer 1

Your method definition is wrong. Instead of assigning a value, you are comparing equality.

def feed
 self.hungry == false; # only one = should be used.
 save!
end

There is a better way to do this, however:

class Pet
  attr_accessor :feed_me
  before_save :feed

  def feed
    hungry = false if feed_me
  end
end

You should not need the controller check:

if @pet.update_attributes(params[:feed])
  @pet.feed
end 

Which is wrong, by the way. You need to check if the param[:feed] exists, not if the pet objet has updated correctly.

For this solution to work, you would need to add an attribute to your form:

= f.check_box :feed_me

Another way to do this would be to map the hungry attribute to the checkbox and just name the label feed:

= f.label :hungry, "Feed"
= f.checkbox :hungry

You could then go ahead and just remove the before_save, the attr_accessor, and the method self.feed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That makes a lot more sense. I've now updated the model and view as you suggested. The only issue now is it doesn't seem to be resetting the "hungry" variable. This is what I have in the model now: attr_accessor :feed_me before_save :feed def feed self.hungry = false if feed_me end (I also tried the original "hungry=false if feed_me") I think it's a small syntax thing, the rest of the logic makes sense to me –  USK Sep 19 '13 at 21:29
    
I updated my answer. Have a look... as for your issue... raise an error to the value of feed_me inside the self.feed method, something like raise feed_me.to_s and see the value you get. Could be that it's not coming through the form correctly. –  Mohamad Sep 19 '13 at 23:53
    
Thank you! I'm sort of trying to do it the hard way by making feed a separate function, because I know I'll need an understanding of how and when to call functions to go on. When I tried raising feed_me, I got a runtime error, which is strange because it actually does appear in the params hash, as "feed_me"=>"1", –  USK Sep 20 '13 at 1:19

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