Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is how I am doing my unit test in groovy.

public void testSomeMethod() {
  doSomething(1,2,3,4);      //this is first test
  doSomething(11,22,33,44);   //this is second test
}


private void doSomething(a, b, c, d) {
  assertEquals(a, actual)
    }

Basically I am calling doSomething 2 times with different values under same test. It might not be a good way to test But I just want to try it out.

So, the problem is, if the first test fails second does't get executed.

Is there a way I can force it to print fail message and move on to next one?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It is a good time for you to use spock, where you can do data driven testing and the second test will not be gated by the first one. You can get more flexibility like the one you have asked for and more.

Eventually, the test would look something like:

void "test something"(){
    when:
       def result = doSomething(a, b, c, d)

    then:
       result == expectedResult

    where:
       a   | b  | c  | d   || expectedResult
       1   | 2  | 3  | 4   || 100           
       11  | 22 | 33 | 44  || 1000
}

private doSomething(a, b, c, d){...}

You can find more details in spock framework documents and/or also have a look at these questions.

BTW, above test example can be over simplified to make it groovier. ;)

void "test something"(){
    expect:
       result == doSomething(a, b, c, d)

    where:
       a   | b  | c  | d   || result
       1   | 2  | 3  | 4   || 100           
       11  | 22 | 33 | 44  || 1000
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking time to show me this. I tried spock and I really like it. Mostly because its so readable and the format of the test helps organize the code very well. –  RSM Sep 23 '13 at 0:39

Although I agree with the advice given to use Spock(great framework) you can also use JUnit parameterized tests if you don't want to include additional dependencies.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried both and I found spock more readable so i am using it. But thanks a lot –  RSM Sep 23 '13 at 0:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.