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I have a main class where I have something like

void FooBar(String s){

  try {
    parseString(s);
  } catch (Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
    System.err.println("Error: " + e.getMessage());
    context.getCounter(Counters.ERROR).increment(1); // this increment doesnt increases
  }
}

parseString is

void ParseString(String s){
  if (matcher.matches()) {

  } else {
    //throw exception
    try {
      throw new Exception("bad formatted N-triples");
    } catch (Exception e) {
      // TODO Auto-generated catch block
      e.printStackTrace();
    }
  }
}

But for some reason, the error is not propagated upwards. In my FooBar method the error counters are not incremented even if the function gets bad formatted data.

How do I propagate this exception upwards?

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you throwing an exception if you just catch it in the catch block? – NullUserException Sep 19 '13 at 22:33
1  
rethrow it, or don't catch it – nachokk Sep 19 '13 at 22:33
3  
You should never throw Exception. Always choose a more appropriate exception provided by the JVM, or throw your own custom exception. This allows other parts of your program to handle your specific exception without catching exceptions that might occur in your progrsm that you do not know how to handle. – Eric Jablow Sep 19 '13 at 22:36
1  
I know this is "example" code, but you should NEVER start a Java method name with an uppercase letter! – Stephen C Sep 19 '13 at 22:48

But for some reason, the error is not propagated upwards...

The reason it is not propagated upwards is that you caught it. Exceptions stop propagating when they are caught.

Either don't catch it in parseString, or rethrow it in the handler; e.g. e.printStackTrace(); throw e;


However, this is likely to get you into more problems, specifically because of the exception you are catching / throwing here. The problem is that Exception is the root of all checked exceptions:

  • Since it is a checked exception, the method parseString must declare that it throws the Exception if you want to the exception to propagate.

  • But throws Exception is saying that this method could throw any possible checked exception ... which makes life difficult for the caller. (Not in this example ... but in general.)

My advice is as follows:

  • Avoid creating / throwing Exception. Pick a more specific (checked or unchecked) exception that reflects the meaning of the "exceptional event" you are trying to report ... or implement your own exception class. In this case throwing IllegalArgumentException would probably be better, though that is an unchecked exception.

  • Avoid situations where you need to propagate Exception.

  • Be careful when you catch Exception. It catches every (non-Error) exception, including all of the unchecked ones; i.e. RuntimeExecption and its subclasses.

share|improve this answer
1  
catch (Exception up) { throw up; } – NullUserException Sep 19 '13 at 22:34
    
@NullUserException - good point :-) – Stephen C Sep 19 '13 at 22:44

You either don't catch it in ParseString, or you rethrow it with throw e;

Once an exception is caught, it doesn't get propagated unless you throw it again.

share|improve this answer

Examine what you're doing here:

try {
  throw new Exception("bad formatted N-triples");//You throw an exception!
} catch (Exception e) {//And immediately catch it!
  e.printStackTrace();
}

Because the exception is caught, it will not propagate. Instead, remove the try/catch block and simply throw the exception:

void ParseString(String s){
  if (matcher.matches()) {
    //code for reasons
  } else {
    //throw exception
    throw new Exception("bad formatted N-triples");
  }
}

Note that this is actually bad practice. You want to say something about your exception, and declare it:

void ParseString(String s) throws IllegalArgumentException {
  if (matcher.matches()) {
    //code for reasons
  } else {
    //throw exception
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("bad formatted N-triples");
  }
}

The surrounding function should know how to cope with that exception explicitly, rather than just throwing it's hands up because it's a general exception.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget to add throws Exception to the method declaration. – Simon Forsberg Sep 19 '13 at 22:35
    
Check the latest edit. :) – Nathaniel Ford Sep 19 '13 at 22:37
1  
Just a side note: IllegalArgumentException is an unchecked exception, so you don't actually need to declare it. – NullUserException Sep 19 '13 at 22:38
    
Sure... but it doesn't hurt. Also, in truly clean code he'd use a more specific exception that he probably created. – Nathaniel Ford Sep 19 '13 at 23:00

You shouldn't surround your error with try/catch:

void ParseString(String s){
  if (matcher.matches()) {

        }
        else{
            //throw exception
            throw new Exception("bad formatted N-triples");}
        }
}

When you throw the error, it's caught in the catch statement within parseString method, which is why isn't isn't propagated to the top.

Ideally, you'd do:

void ParseString(String s) throws Exception  {
  if (matcher.matches()) {

        }
        else{
            //throw exception
            throw new Exception("bad formatted N-triples");}
        }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I originally had this.. but eclipse suggested Unhandled exception type Exception and then i had a try catch block.. – Fraz Sep 19 '13 at 22:35
2  
@Fraz Read the error. You need void ParseString(String s) throws Exception { – NullUserException Sep 19 '13 at 22:35
    
You've specified throws IllegalArgumentException and yet you throw a regular Exception. Typo was here? :) – Simon Forsberg Sep 19 '13 at 22:54
    
Yes, sorry... Thank you. Fixed. – BlackHatSamurai Sep 19 '13 at 22:57

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