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OK, in the following code, what would be proper for the attribute names?

class ClassOne(object):
    a = 1

class ClassTwo(object):
    some_class = ClassOne

    def _get_other_class(self):
        return self._other_class

    def _set_other_class(self, value):
        self._other_class = value

    other_class = property(_get_other_class, _set_other_class)

    class InnerClass(object):
        b = 2

Is it more proper for "some_class" to be "some_class" because it is an attribute or "SomeClass" because it references a class? Same with "other_class". So the second option would be more like:

class ClassOne(object):
    a = 1

class ClassTwo(object):
    SomeClass = ClassOne

    def _get_other_class(self):
        return self._other_class

    def _set_other_class(self, value):
        self._other_class = value

    OtherClass = property(_get_other_class, _set_other_class)

    class InnerClass(object):
        b = 2

It seems like it would be more clear that they are classes if capitalized, but pep8 says that attributes should be lowercase with underscores. However, InnerClass ends up being an attribute of ClassTwo with a capitalized name.

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2  
Inner classes, getters, setters ... Your last language wouldn't happen to be Java, would it? PEP 8 doesn't address your situation because it rarely arises. What is your use case? –  Steven Rumbalski Sep 19 '13 at 23:09
1  
@StevenRumbalski: Actually, I think PEP 8 does cover this situation just fine. But your larger point is valid. It's very hard to answer style questions about code that's semantically empty and isn't at all stylistically Pythonic… –  abarnert Sep 19 '13 at 23:34
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your example, the fact that these variables are holding class objects seems to be irrelevant.

Look at what PEP 8 says about the arguments to class methods:

Always use cls or the first argument to class methods.

In the very next line, you've got this example:

If a function argument's name clashes with a reserved keyword, it is generally better to append a single trailing underscore rather than use an abbreviation or spelling corruption. Thus class_ is better than clss.

And you can find examples of both cases, and similar cases (e.g., assigning eggs = type(spam)), all over the stdlib.

Variables (attributes, parameters, locals, globals, etc.—and, yes, properties, because the whole point is that they look like normal instance attributes) get lowercase names. It doesn't matter what type of value you expect them to hold.


However, InnerClass ends up being an attribute of ClassTwo with a capitalized name.

That's true, but it's not relevant. It's exactly the same as the way ClassTwo ends up being a global variable in the module. InnerClass is being defined as a class, not as a variable/parameter/attribute.


Of course you can come up with edge cases where it's less clear. For example, should you do foo_bar = types.ClassType('foo_bar', (object,), {}) or FooBar = types.ClassType('FooBar', (object,), {}) or foo_bar = types.ClassType('FooBar', (object,), {})?

But PEP 8 isn't a hard and fast set of rules to cover every scenario; there are always edge cases. Most of the time, the distinction between a class and a variable is obvious, so PEP 8's recommendation is obvious. When the distinction isn't obvious, PEP 8 can't help.

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