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In case below changing of any input will cause changing in all of them. As I understood, it happens because data object is common for all of 3 scopes

<div class="content-container" ng-app="">
<input type="text" ng-model="data.message">
<h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
<div ng-controller="FirstController">
    <input type="text" ng-model="data.message">
    <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
</div>
<div ng-controller="SecondController">
    <input type="text" ng-model="data.message">
    <h1>{{data.message}}</h1>
</div>

but in case below each scope will have it's own message object:

<div class="content-container" ng-app="">
<input type="text" ng-model="message">
<h1>{{message}}</h1>
<div ng-controller="FirstController">
    <input type="text" ng-model="message">
    <h1>{{message}}</h1>
</div>
<div ng-controller="SecondController">
    <input type="text" ng-model="message">
    <h1>{{message}}</h1>
</div>

It is not clear for me, why angular create "message" object for each scope but do not create "data" object for each scope? What is the major difference between this two examples?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not about how AngularJS works - it's about how JavaScript works, actually. Consider the following:

function Parent() { 
  this.message = ''; 
  this.data    = {};
}
function Child() {}; Child.prototype = new Parent();

As you see, Parent, when used as a constructor, defines two properties for a fresh object. Let's say we're going to use the first one to store a primitive, and the second one to store an object.

Child function is defined really simple: no properties of its own, having Parent object in its prototype chain. Now that's do some more things with them:

var c = new Child();
c.message      = '42';
c.data.message = '42';
console.log(c.hasOwnProperty('message'));         // true
console.log(c.hasOwnProperty('data'));            // false
console.log(c.data.hasOwnProperty('message'));    // true

See the difference? In the first case, with c.message, we have defined a new property on a child object (c) itself - and that one now shadows the same-named property defined on its prototype.

In the second case, however, we are still using the property of parent, extending its value with a new property. No new properties are defined on c, only its prototype is affected; the difference is even more telling here:

var d = new Child();
d.message      = '34';
d.data.message = '34';

console.log(c.message);      // still '42'
console.log(c.data.message); // now '34'

Similar things happen when you use Angular directive: a new scope is defined, inheriting all the 'model' properties from its parent scope. But unless these properties are 'two-level', assigning to them will introduce the same-named property on a child level, shadowing the one defined for the parent.

I'd suggest studying Understanding Scopes document from Angular wiki: it has much more substantial (and richly illustrated, too!) explanation for this behavior. This quote, however, summarizes it pretty well:

This issue with primitives can be easily avoided by following the "best practice" of always have a '.' in your ng-models.

And it has some workarounds mentioned for the cases when one indeed wants to work with primitives only: $parent.parentScopeProperty is the most straight-forward one, I suppose.

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