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Here is my code that for this. I am traversing the whole tree and then doing a find on each node. find() takes O(log n), and so the whole program takes O(n log n) time.

Is there a better way to implement this program? I am not just talking of better in terms of time complexity but in general as well. How best to implement this?

public boolean searchNum(BinTreeNode node, int num) {
    //validate the input

    if (node == null) {
        return false;
    }
    // terminal case for recursion

    int result = num - node.item;
    //I have a separate find() which finds if the key is in the tree
    if (find(result)) {
        return true;
    }
    return seachNum(node.leftChild, num) || searchNum(node.rightChilde, num);

}

public boolean find(int key) {

    BinTreeNode node = findHelper(key, root);
    if (node == null) {
        return false;
    } else {
        return true;
    }
}


private BinTreeNode findHelper(int key, BinTreeNode node) {
    if (node == null) {
        return null;
    }
    if (key == node.item) {
        return node;
    } else if (key < node.item) {
        return findHelper(key, node.leftChild);
    } else {
        return findHelper(key, node.rightChild);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I think you should put 'Binary Search Tree' instead of just tree in the title. – Chen Pang Sep 20 '13 at 1:17
    
Is it the sum of any two nodes, or only of adjacent nodes? Are node values unique for a tree? – Bohemian Sep 20 '13 at 1:21
    
@ Chen Pang - I think my program will work on any tree, not just a binary search tree. I just do pre-order traversal and run find() on each node. Let me know if I'm wrong. – Prasanna Sep 20 '13 at 1:45
    
@Bohemian - It's any 2 nodes, not just adjacent nodes. – Prasanna Sep 20 '13 at 1:45
    
Are node values unique? – Bohemian Sep 20 '13 at 3:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Finding two nodes in binary search tree sum to some value can be done in the similar way of finding two elements in a sorted array that sums to the value.

In the case with an array sorted from small to large, you keep two pointers, one start from beginning, one start from the end. If the sum of the two elements pointed by the pointers is larger than the target, you move the right pointer to left by one, if the sum is smaller than target, you move the left pointer to right by one. Eventually the two pointer will either points to two elements that sum to the target value, or meet in the middle.

boolean searchNumArray(int[] arr, int num) {
    int left = 0;
    int right = arr.length - 1;
    while (left < right) {
        int sum = arr[left] + arr[right];
        if (sum == num) {
          return true;
        } else if (sum > num) {
          right--;
        } else {
          left++;
        }
    }
    return false;
} 

If you do an in-order traversal of the binary search tree, it becomes a sorted array. So you can apply the same idea on binary search tree.

The following code do iterative in-order traversal from both directions. Stack is being used for the traversal, so the time complexity is O(n) and space complexity is O(h), where h is the height of the binary tree.

class BinTreeIterator implements Iterator<BinTreeNode> {
    Stack<BinTreeNode> stack;
    boolean leftToRight;

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return !stack.empty();
    }

    public BinTreeNode next() {
        return stack.peek();
    }

    public void remove() {
        BinTreeNode node = stack.pop();
        if (leftToRight) {
            node = node.rightChild;
            while (node.rightChild != null) {
                stack.push(node);
                node = node.rightChild;
            }
        } else {
            node = node.leftChild;
            while (node.leftChild != null) {
                stack.push(node);
                node = node.leftChild;
            }
        }
    }

    public BinTreeIterator(BinTreeNode node, boolean leftToRight) {
        stack = new Stack<BinTreeNode>();
        this.leftChildToRight = leftToRight;

        if (leftToRight) {
            while (node != null) {
                stack.push(node);
                node = node.leftChild;
            }
        } else {
            while (node != null) {
                stack.push(node);
                node = node.rightChild;
            }
        }            
    }
}



public static boolean searchNumBinTree(BinTreeNode node, int num) {
    if (node == null)
        return false;

    BinTreeIterator leftIter = new BinTreeIterator(node);
    BinTreeIterator rightIter = new BinTreeIterator(node);

    while (leftIter.hasNext() && rightIter.hasNext()) {
        BinTreeNode left = leftIter.next();
        BinTreeNode right = rightIter.next();
        int sum = left.item + right.item;
        if (sum == num) {
            return true;
        } else if (sum > num) {
            rightIter.remove();
            if (!rightIter.hasNext() || rightIter.next() == left) {
                return false;
            }
        } else {
            leftIter.remove();
            if (!leftIter.hasNext() || leftIter.next() == right) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Chen. Right, for binary search trees, we can use in-order which takes O(n) and then the array method will also be O(n), so the total running time is O(n), correct? – Prasanna Sep 20 '13 at 1:50
    
Yes, that is correct – Chen Pang Sep 20 '13 at 2:05
    
Thank you. This is helpful. Do you think my code works for all types of trees? In that case, how best can we implement it? Because in-order won't sort any tree. – Prasanna Sep 20 '13 at 2:19
    
No. If it's not a binary search tree, finding a node of certain value would need O(n), making the overall complexity O (n^2). Your algorithm for finding a node is treating the tree as binary search tree – Chen Pang Sep 20 '13 at 2:27
    
Oh, I see. So if it's not a binary search tree, how else can find() be implemented? Well, you can still store the elements in in-order or pre-order (O(n), then sort (O(log n), and then find (O(n)? So, the total is O(n)? Will this work? – Prasanna Sep 20 '13 at 2:32

As far as I know, O(log n) is the best possible searching function you can use. I'm interested in the "n". If you're using a for-loop somewhere, consider using a hashtable in its stead. Hash table seeking is O(1) if I recall correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Rather, another suggestion would be to use a Heap which would allow certain searches to be more efficient, but you would need to be mindful about re-balancing your heap as you would with binary trees. – MSalmo Sep 20 '13 at 1:21
    
I get the "n" because I do a pre-order traversal of the tree and then find() on each node I traverse. – Prasanna Sep 20 '13 at 1:46

From http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/find-a-pair-with-given-sum-in-bst/

/* In a balanced binary search tree isPairPresent two element which sums to
   a given value time O(n) space O(logn) */
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define MAX_SIZE 100

// A BST node
struct node
{
    int val;
    struct node *left, *right;
};

// Stack type
struct Stack
{
    int size;
    int top;
    struct node* *array;
};

// A utility function to create a stack of given size
struct Stack* createStack(int size)
{
    struct Stack* stack =
        (struct Stack*) malloc(sizeof(struct Stack));
    stack->size = size;
    stack->top = -1;
    stack->array =
        (struct node**) malloc(stack->size * sizeof(struct node*));
    return stack;
}

// BASIC OPERATIONS OF STACK
int isFull(struct Stack* stack)
{   return stack->top - 1 == stack->size;  }

int isEmpty(struct Stack* stack)
{   return stack->top == -1;   }

void push(struct Stack* stack, struct node* node)
{
    if (isFull(stack))
        return;
    stack->array[++stack->top] = node;
}

struct node* pop(struct Stack* stack)
{
    if (isEmpty(stack))
        return NULL;
    return stack->array[stack->top--];
}

// Returns true if a pair with target sum exists in BST, otherwise false
bool isPairPresent(struct node *root, int target)
{
    // Create two stacks. s1 is used for normal inorder traversal
    // and s2 is used for reverse inorder traversal
    struct Stack* s1 = createStack(MAX_SIZE);
    struct Stack* s2 = createStack(MAX_SIZE);

    // Note the sizes of stacks is MAX_SIZE, we can find the tree size and
    // fix stack size as O(Logn) for balanced trees like AVL and Red Black
    // tree. We have used MAX_SIZE to keep the code simple

    // done1, val1 and curr1 are used for normal inorder traversal using s1
    // done2, val2 and curr2 are used for reverse inorder traversal using s2
    bool done1 = false, done2 = false;
    int val1 = 0, val2 = 0;
    struct node *curr1 = root, *curr2 = root;

    // The loop will break when we either find a pair or one of the two
    // traversals is complete
    while (1)
    {
        // Find next node in normal Inorder traversal. See following post
        // http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/inorder-tree-traversal-without-recursion/
        while (done1 == false)
        {
            if (curr1 != NULL)
            {
                push(s1, curr1);
                curr1 = curr1->left;
            }
            else
            {
                if (isEmpty(s1))
                    done1 = 1;
                else
                {
                    curr1 = pop(s1);
                    val1 = curr1->val;
                    curr1 = curr1->right;
                    done1 = 1;
                }
            }
        }

        // Find next node in REVERSE Inorder traversal. The only
        // difference between above and below loop is, in below loop
        // right subtree is traversed before left subtree
        while (done2 == false)
        {
            if (curr2 != NULL)
            {
                push(s2, curr2);
                curr2 = curr2->right;
            }
            else
            {
                if (isEmpty(s2))
                    done2 = 1;
                else
                {
                    curr2 = pop(s2);
                    val2 = curr2->val;
                    curr2 = curr2->left;
                    done2 = 1;
                }
            }
        }

        // If we find a pair, then print the pair and return. The first
        // condition makes sure that two same values are not added
        if ((val1 != val2) && (val1 + val2) == target)
        {
            printf("\n Pair Found: %d + %d = %d\n", val1, val2, target);
            return true;
        }

        // If sum of current values is smaller, then move to next node in
        // normal inorder traversal
        else if ((val1 + val2) < target)
            done1 = false;

        // If sum of current values is greater, then move to next node in
        // reverse inorder traversal
        else if ((val1 + val2) > target)
            done2 = false;

        // If any of the inorder traversals is over, then there is no pair
        // so return false
        if (val1 >= val2)
            return false;
    }
}

// A utility function to create BST node
struct node * NewNode(int val)
{
    struct node *tmp = (struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    tmp->val = val;
    tmp->right = tmp->left =NULL;
    return tmp;
}

// Driver program to test above functions
int main()
{
    /*
                   15
                /     \
              10      20
             / \     /  \
            8  12   16  25    */
    struct node *root =  NewNode(15);
    root->left = NewNode(10);
    root->right = NewNode(20);
    root->left->left = NewNode(8);
    root->left->right = NewNode(12);
    root->right->left = NewNode(16);
    root->right->right = NewNode(25);

    int target = 28;
    if (isPairPresent(root, target) == false)
        printf("\n No such values are found\n");

    getchar();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Chen Pang has already given a perfect answer. However, I was trying the same problem today and I could come up with the following solution. Posting it here as it might help some one.

The idea is same as that of earlier solution, just that I am doing it with two stacks - one following the inorder(stack1) and another following reverse - inorder order(stack2). Once we reach the left-most and the right-most node in a BST, we can start comparing them together.

If the sum is less than the required value, pop out from stack1, else pop from stack2. Following is java implementation of the same:

public int sum2(TreeNode A, int B) {
    Stack<TreeNode> stack1 = new Stack<>();
    Stack<TreeNode> stack2 = new Stack<>();
    TreeNode cur1 = A;
    TreeNode cur2 = A;

    while (!stack1.isEmpty() || !stack2.isEmpty() ||
            cur1 != null || cur2 != null) {
        if (cur1 != null || cur2 != null) {
            if (cur1 != null) {
                stack1.push(cur1);
                cur1 = cur1.left;
            }

            if (cur2 != null) {
                stack2.push(cur2);
                cur2 = cur2.right;
            }
        } else {
            int val1 = stack1.peek().val;
            int val2 = stack2.peek().val;

            // need to break out of here
            if (stack1.peek() == stack2.peek()) break;

            if (val1 +  val2 == B) return 1;

            if (val1 + val2 < B) {
                cur1 = stack1.pop();
                cur1 = cur1.right;
            } else {
                cur2 = stack2.pop();
                cur2 = cur2.left;
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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