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I have found what I would consider erratic behavior (but for which I hope there is a simple explanation) in R's use of seeds in conjunction with rbinom() when prob=0.5 is used. General idea: To me, if I set the seed, run rbinom() once (i.e. conduct a single random process), despite what value prob is set to, the random seed should change by one increment. Then, if I again set the seed to the same value, and run another random process (such as rbinom() again, but maybe with a different value of prob), the seed should again change to the same value as it did for the previous single random process.

I have found R does exactly this as long as I'm using rbinom() with any prob!=0.5. Here is an example:

Compare seed vector, .Random.seed, for two probabilities other than 0.5:

set.seed(234908)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.4)
temp1 <- .Random.seed

set.seed(234908)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.3)
temp2 <- .Random.seed

any(temp1!=temp2)
> [1] FALSE

Compare seed vector, .Random.seed, for prob=0.5 vs. prob!=0.5:

set.seed(234908)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.5)
temp1 <- .Random.seed

set.seed(234908)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.3)
temp2 <- .Random.seed
any(temp1!=temp2)
> [1] TRUE

temp1==temp2
> [1]  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
> [8]  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
...

I have found this for all comparisions of prob=0.5 against all other probabilities in the set {0.1, 0.2, ..., 0.9}. Similarly, if I compare any values of prob from {0.1, 0.2, ..., 0.9} other than 0.5, the .Random.seed vector is always element-by-element equal. These facts also hold true for either odd or even size within rbinom().

To make it even more strange (I apologize that this is a little convoluted - it's relevant to the way my function is written), when I use probabilities saved as elements in a vector, I have same problem if 0.5 is first element, but not second. Here is the example for this case:

First case: 0.5 is the first probability referenced in the vector

set.seed(234908)
MNAR <- c(0.5,0.3)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=MNAR[1])
y <- rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=MNAR[2])
temp1 <- .Random.seed

set.seed(234908)
MNAR <- c(0.1,0.3)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=MNAR[1])
y <- rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=MNAR[2])
temp2 <- .Random.seed

any(temp1!=temp2)
> [1] TRUE

any(temp1!=temp2)
> [1]  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
> [8]  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE

Second case: 0.5 is the second probability referenced in the vector

set.seed(234908)
MNAR <- c(0.3,0.5)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=MNAR[1])
y <- rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=MNAR[2])
temp1 <- .Random.seed

set.seed(234908)
MNAR <- c(0.1,0.3)
x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=MNAR[1])
y <- rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=MNAR[2])
temp2 <- .Random.seed

any(temp1!=temp2)
> [1] FALSE

Again, I find that despite the values used for prob and size, this pattern holds. Can anyone explain this mystery to me? It's causing quite a problem because results that should be the same are coming up different because the seed is for some reason used/calculated differently when prob=0.5 but in no other instance.

share|improve this question
1  
Perhaps a more concise example of this behavior would be set.seed(123);rbinom(1,60,0.5);rbinom(1,60,0.3); set.seed(123);rbinom(1,60,0.2);rbinom(1,60,0.3); set.seed(123);rbinom(1,60,0.4);rbinom(1,60,0.3) ? –  joran Sep 20 '13 at 1:56
4  
I would go to svn.r-project.org/R/trunk/src/nmath/rbinom.c , search for unif_rand(), and follow the logic through ... –  Ben Bolker Sep 20 '13 at 2:16
4  
An interesting result using @joran's example above is that you get back on your feet if you make prob = 0.2 or prob = 0.4 draw two numbers instead of one. It suggests that prob = 0.5 requires drawing twice as many random numbers than the other probs. That theory also checks out by replacing 60 with 120 in the OP's x <- rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.3) case. –  flodel Sep 20 '13 at 2:18
16  
HA! Look at the code Ben pointed to: there are sections for n*p >= 30 and n*p < 30. The former uses two calls to unif_rand(), the latter a single one. Now notice that your example used prob = 0.5 and size = 60, i.e. n*p == 30! Test with size = 59 and the behavior disappears! –  flodel Sep 20 '13 at 2:35
2  
@flodel: write that up as an answer! –  Ben Bolker Sep 20 '13 at 3:31

2 Answers 2

So let's turn our comments into an answer. Thanks to Ben Bolker for putting us on the right track with a link to the code: https://svn.r-project.org/R/trunk/src/nmath/rbinom.c and the suggestion to track down where unif_rand() is called.

A quick scan and it seems that the code is broken into two sections, delimited by the comments:

/*-------------------------- np = n*p >= 30 : ------------------- */

and

/*---------------------- np = n*p < 30 : ------------------------- */

Inside each of these, the number of calls to unif_rand is not the same (two versus one.)

So for a given size (n), your random seed may end up in a different state depending on the value of prob (p): whether size * prob >= 30 or not.

With that in mind, all the results you got with your examples should now make sense:

# these end up in the same state
rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.4) # => np <  30
rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.3) # => np <  30

# these don't
rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.5) # => np >= 30
rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.3) # => np <  30

# these don't
{rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.5)  # np >= 30
 rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=0.3)} # np <  30
{rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.1)  # np <  30
 rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=0.3)} # np <  30

# these do
{rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.3)  # np <  30
 rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=0.5)} # np <  30
{rbinom(n=1,size=60,prob=0.1)  # np <  30
 rbinom(n=1,size=50,prob=0.3)} # np <  30
share|improve this answer
    
That's great. However, I guess for me I'm still in trouble, as the sample size is drawn at random in my code (I just picked some numbers here for illustration). It's good to know where it's going wrong at least, but my simulation will still suffer. And this still makes me uncomfortable, haha. Thanks everyone! –  Meg Sep 20 '13 at 11:02
1  
@Meg Now that we know what is going on, you should be able to deal with it either by making sure you use the same prob values in comparison runs, or by calling set.seed at multiple (matching) locations in your code to "reset" the common sequences. –  Carl Witthoft Sep 20 '13 at 11:39
3  
Why not post to R-devel as a feature request? It seems like rbinom should have consistent effect on the random number stream regardless of parameter values; runif does. –  Martin Morgan Sep 20 '13 at 11:48
2  
The np>30 algorithm uses a rejection method -- there are two uniform random samples drawn for every iteration of the method, which means that the number of samples drawn will depend not just on the parameters, but on the current state of the RNG. I think this reinforces @BrianDigg's answer that your desired behaviour may not be practical. (@MartinMorgan's comment that runif has a consistent effects on the stream and that therefore all r*'s should isn't really fair: runif is the fundamental building block and calls unif_rand directly. –  Ben Bolker Sep 20 '13 at 16:35
1  
[continued] unless you can always use a deterministic transformation method, you won't be able to make the guarantees you want. –  Ben Bolker Sep 20 '13 at 16:36

I'm going to take a contrarian position on this question and claim that the expectations are not appropriate and are not supported by the documentation. The documentation does not make any claim about what side effects (specifically on .Random.seed) can be expected by calling rbinom, or how those side effects may or may not be the same in various cases.

rbinom has three parameters: n, size, and prob. Your expectation is that, for a random seed set before calling rbinom, .Random.seed will be the same after calling rbinom for a given n and any values of size and prob (or maybe any finite values of size and prob). You certainly realize that it would be different for different values of n. rbinom doesn't guarantee that or imply that.

Without knowing the internals of the function, this can't be known; as the other answer showed, the algorithm is different based on the product of size and prob. And the internals may change so these specific details may change.

At least, in this case, the resulting .Random.seed will be the same after every call of rbinom which has the same n, size and prob. I can construct a pathological function for which this is not even true:

seedtweak <- function() {
  if(floor(as.POSIXlt(Sys.time())$sec * 10) %% 2) {
    runif(1)
  }
  invisible(NULL)
}

Basically, this function looks a whether the tenths of the second of the time is odd or even to decided whether or not to draw a random number. Run this function and .Random.seed may or may not change:

rs <- replicate(10, {
  set.seed(123) 
  seedtweak()
  .Random.seed
})
all(apply(rs, 1, function(x) Reduce(`==`, x)))

The best you can (should?) hope for is that a given set of code with all the inputs/parameters the same (including the seed) will always give identical results. Expecting identical results when only most (or only some) of the parameters are the same is not realistic unless all the functions called make those guarantees.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I totally agree. Moreover, it may be simply impossible to guarantee this kind of reproducibility; consider, for instance, rejection sampling. –  Ferdinand.kraft Sep 22 '13 at 16:24
    
great argument & write up! –  Ricardo Saporta Oct 14 '13 at 18:44

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