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I'd like someone to confirm the correct way to create the below query. The docs are full of trivial examples of queries, but some medium-complexity examples would be useful - in order to know best practices.

I can filter with a query such as this:

r.table('backups').filter(
    {'verified': True}
).run(conn)

The same query can be written this way, with ReQL lambda shorthand:

r.table('backups').filter(
    r.row['verified'] == True
).run(conn)

I then tried to add another filter to this query, like so, but it didn't return the correct results:

r.table('backups').filter(
    r.row['verified'] == True and r.row['id'].match("^aad")
).run(conn)

Is the correct way to write this query to use two filter calls?

r.table('backups').filter(
    r.row['verified'] == True
).filter(
    r.row['id'].match("^aad")
).run(conn)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Python's and operator does not translate into the RethinkDB query language. You must use & instead:

r.table('backups').filter(
  (r.row['verified'] == True) & r.row['id'].match("^aad")
).run(conn)
share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes. I saw the single ampersand and assumed it was a bitwise operation. It's actually used for logic in ReQL: rethinkdb.com/api/#py:math_and_logic-and –  mafro Sep 21 '13 at 2:22
    
Oh and bonus points for confirming if 2 filter calls is the same as using the ampersand :) –  mafro Sep 21 '13 at 2:28
    
Yes, using & or using two filters will give the same results. –  AtnNn Sep 21 '13 at 2:49

In fact this is the best approach:

r.table('backups').filter(
  (doc['verified'] == _filters.get('verified') if _filters.has_key("verified") else doc['verified']) & \
  (doc['id'] == _filters.get('id') if _filters.has_key("id") else doc['id'])
).run(conn)

Usually you have a dict of values that you want to filter and not mock values as the accepted answer. By default if some parameter is set null it will filter the null values. This one doesnt do that, just filter the ones that are present in the dict

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