Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I've been working in Xcode4 for an app that has multiple collection views (4, to be exact)

I have two views, a bottom 'main' view, which contains one large collection view that fills the screen, and a smaller 'drawer' view that can be pulled out from the side and contains three narrow, horizontally scrolling collection views stacked one on top of the other.

I have been population the cells using tags and if statements in the cellforitematpath method. in xcode 4, and a project i made in xcode 4 and am now opening in xcode 5, this works. I get a warning (not error) at the bottom that says control may reach end of non void function, but i am still able to build and run and it works.

In a new project in xcode 5 the same code says 'control may reach end of non void function' as an error and does not allow build and run. this is endlessly frustrating. I don't want to return a cell unless there is an array to be populating cells. i don't even know what 'return nil' means. does anyone have any suggestions on how to turn this off?

the following is definitely not pretty, enter at your own risk:

- (UICollectionViewCell *) collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView
                   cellForItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    if (collectionView.tag == 0){
        static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"subjectCell";
        SubjectCell *cell = [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];

        AHSubject *cellSubject = [self.subjectsArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

        [[cell subjectLabel]setText:cellSubject.name];

        return cell;
    }
    else if (collectionView.tag == 1){
        if ([categoryArray count] > 0) {
            static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"categoryCell";
            CategoryCell *cell = [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];

            AHCategory *cellCategory = [categoryArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

            [[cell categoryLabel]setText:cellCategory.name];

            return cell;
        }
    }
    else if (collectionView.tag == 2){
        if ([subcategoryArray count] > 0) {
            static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"subcategoryCell";
            GroupCell *cell = [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];

            AHCardGroup *cellSubcategory = [subcategoryArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

            [[cell subcategoryLabel]setText:cellSubcategory.name];

            return cell;
        }
    }
    else {
        if ([cardArray count] > 0) {
            static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"cardCell";
            CardCell *cell = [collectionView dequeueReusableCellWithReuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier forIndexPath:indexPath];

            AHCard *cellCard = [cardArray objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];

            [[cell frontLabel]setText:cellCard.front];

            return cell;
        }
    }
    // return nil;
}
share|improve this question
    
Yeah, make the function return something. The compiler has gotten fussier about such things, due to the analysis it now does for ARC. –  Hot Licks Sep 20 '13 at 4:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just uncomment the return nil, and it will be fine. Because your final else handles all cases, the code will never reach that return nil, but Xcode's analyzer is apparently not smart enough to know that.

Edit: the setting for this can be found in Build Settings, under Apple LLVM 5.0 - Warnings - All languages. It falls under "Mismatched Return Type", which used to default to Yes, and now defaults to Yes (treat as error). You could change this setting to change it back to a warning. But I wouldn't do that. Just uncomment your return nil and it's fine.

I would point out that reaching the end of a non-void function without returning a value IS an error, and is very likely to lead to a crash, whereas returning nil (for example) will likely not. Consider the following trivial example:

- (NSString*) someString
{
    return nil;
}

// ... someplace elsewhere in the code:
NSString* aString = [self someString];
NSLog( @"aString = %@", aString );

This is fine, and your output will be something like:

aThing returned (null)

Now if you comment out that return, thus:

- (NSString*) someString
{
    // return nil;
}

// ... someplace elsewhere in the code:
NSString* aString = [self someString];
NSLog( @"aString = %@", aString );

The NSLog call will dereference some random memory location (whatever happened to be on the stack, I think), and your app will almost certainly crash.

If you have a function that returns a value of some type, it must always return a value of that type.

Edit2 (in response to @Dave DeLong's comment): Good point, returning nil from collectionView:cellForItemAtIndexPath: is an error, but I might argue that it's a less egregious error than simply letting the function end with no return value. It turns out to be slightly academic, as the OP's code is such that the final return nil will never execute, anyway.

One could rewrite the function in such a way as to avoid the warning and typing "return nil", thusly:

- (UICollectionViewCell *) collectionView:(UICollectionView *)collectionView    cellForItemAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    id cell = nil;

    if (collectionView.tag == 0) {
        // Make a Subject cell
    }
    else if (collectionView.tag == 1) {
        // Make a Category cell.
    }
    else {
        // Make a Card cell.
    } 

    return cell;
}

...but the end result is the same as the OP's original code (with return nil uncommented): the function could, but won't, return nil.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Returning nil from this method is an error. The docs for -[<UICollectionViewDataSource> collectionView:cellForItemAtIndexPath:] say "You must not return nil from this method." –  Dave DeLong Sep 20 '13 at 3:29
    
@Dave DeLong: good catch, I wasn't aware of that. I updated my answer with my thoughts on that. –  zpasternack Sep 20 '13 at 3:38
    
If the UICollectionView method is anything like the UITableView equivalent, returning nil will result in your app crashing. –  Dave DeLong Sep 20 '13 at 3:52
    
Fair enough, but if your collectionView:cellForItemAtIndexPath: doesn't return a valid UICollectionViewCell, it's gotta either return nil or have the function end and the caller reference some random memory location. Though either would be bad, I'd choose the former over the latter. –  zpasternack Sep 20 '13 at 4:08
3  
The final "else" case doesn't seem to handle all cases. What if cardCount == 0? This is probably what the static analyzer is complaining about. If you can be strongly confident that this will never be reached, shutting up the compiler with return nil might be appropriate even if the method is never supposed to return nil. –  zneak Sep 20 '13 at 4:44

Xcode is right to complain here. Nothing indicates in that code that one of your return statements will surely be called.

  1. If you consider that your code should never reach the last line or it would show a bug elsewhere in your program and you don't want to try to degrade gracefully, you should put an assertion here (e.g. assert(false);), this will make your program crash instead of trying to do something that you might not have planned. assert being marked as a no-return function, the compiler knows that your code does not need a return value after this line.

  2. If you consider that your code could reach the last line (depending on potentially malformed incoming data) or if you want to degrade gracefully in case of a bug elsewhere in your code, you should decide what to return here. Returning nil might not be the best idea as the UICollectionView won't like such a cell (from the documentation: "You must not return nil from this method") and will raise an exception, leading ultimately to a crash (so better crash by yourself as it will be easier to track in crash logs). Of course, this approach requires some thinking.

share|improve this answer
    
whoa. never though about it like that. I will try the assert (false) thing and see how it works. right now I'm gonna stick with return nil... =/ i'm happy when things work at all, i'll get to making them work right/well later... thanks for the response! –  user2751382 Sep 20 '13 at 22:40

So you just need a default. This method is really intended for styling things based on some state in the represented object.

Just make one tag unchecked or choose a default view to return for the things that don't have tags matching your values.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.