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HTML doesn't support client-side inclusion of other HTML, such as one gets for C with the #include directive. Instead, the dominant tools for client-side HTML inclusion appear to be iframe, object, and especially jQuery's .load. See this thread for examples.

Unfortunately, none of these methods seem to produce exactly the same DOM one would get from a #include. In particular, iframe and object wrap the included content in their respective tags. Also, the jQuery solution proposed in the example thread still results in a DOM with an extra div.

For example, consider the thread's jQuery solution:

a.html:

<html> 
  <head> 
    <script src="jquery.js"></script> 
    <script> 
    $(function(){
      $("#includedContent").load("b.html"); 
    });
    </script> 
  </head> 

  <body> 
     <div id="includedContent"></div>
  </body> 
</html>

b.html:

<p> This is my include file </p>

This will create a DOM where the body part looks like:

<body> 
  <div id="includedContent">
    <p> This is my include file </p>
  </div>
</body>

but a true #include would not include the wrapping div, so the DOM would look like:

<body> 
  <p> This is my include file </p>
</body>

Any idea how to do a client-side include without the wrapper tags?

EDIT: I don't want to assume knowledge of the surrounding tags. For example, in this case the surrounding tag is body, but it won't be in all cases.

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4  
Why not selecting the body element? $("body").load("b.html"); –  undefined Sep 20 '13 at 3:55
    
HTML has supported client-side inclusion since early days; browser vendors just didn’t implement it, except when processing XHTML as genuine XHTML (i.e., as XML with HTML tags) – you can declare an entity and use an entity reference. But there’s a reason why browsers vendors didn’t bother: inclusion is best done server-side. –  Jukka K. Korpela Sep 20 '13 at 6:20
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I assume that your body has other elements or other inclusion tags like these, in which case you can use the callback of load to unwrap itself once the load is completed.

 $(function(){
   $("#includedContent").load("b.html", function(){
        $(this).contents().unwrap();
   }); 
});

You can isolate this callback function and use it for any other load that you'd be performing across.

   function unWrapPlaceholder(){
     $(this).contents().unwrap();
   }


    $(function(){
       $("#includedContent").load("b.html", unWrapPlaceholder); 
       $("#headerContent").load("h.html", unWrapPlaceholder); 
       $("#footerContent").load("f.html", unWrapPlaceholder); 
    });
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Shameless plug of a library that I wrote the solve similar problem.

https://github.com/LexmarkWeb/csi.js

<div data-include="/path/to/include.html"></div>

The above will take the contents of /path/to/include.html and replace the div with it.

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In your example you've already defined the wrapper element in the DOM before you use jQuery to load the content.

<body> 
  <div id="includedContent"></div>
</body> 

If you're using jQuery to .load() you specify where you want the content to go. There's no reason why you can't use

$("body").load("b.html"); 

Which will give you

<body> 
  <p> This is my include file </p>
</body>
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You may want to know how jQuery.load() works which is documented here.

Now, in jQuery when you select a object and call the load function, you want the that specific object to change.

like in your example

$("#includedContent").load("b.html");

you selected the div element with id includedContent to be transformed. And the code is specifically doing that. Load is made to load and not include. Since ajax needs to modify mostly parts of pages rather than whole page.

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Combining the ideas from the other answers:

$(function(){
    $("[data-include]").each(function(){
        var that = $(this);
        that.load(that.attr('data-include'), function(){
            that.contents().unwrap();
        }); 
    });
});

Now you can easily import with syntax similar to other languages, i.e.:

<div data-include="includes/topmenu.html"></div>
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