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How can I get list all the files within a folder recursively in Java?

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what do you mean by TREE? please rephrase your question if you're seeking a method to LIST all files within a folder (recursively). –  Peter Perháč May 8 '12 at 10:10
    
@PeterPerháč this question is 4 years old.. :) thanks –  Lipis May 8 '12 at 11:58
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7 Answers 7

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Not sure how you want to represent the tree? Anyway here's an example which scans the entire subtree using recursion. Files and directories are treated alike. Note that File.listFiles() returns null for non-directories.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Collection<File> all = new ArrayList<File>();
    addTree(new File("."), all);
    System.out.println(all);
}

static void addTree(File file, Collection<File> all) {
    File[] children = file.listFiles();
    if (children != null) {
        for (File child : children) {
            all.add(child);
            addTree(child, all);
        }
    }
}

Java 7 offers a couple of improvements. For example, DirectoryStream provides one result at a time - the caller no longer has to wait for all I/O operations to complete before acting. This allows incremental GUI updates, early cancellation, etc.

static void addTree(Path directory, Collection<Path> all)
        throws IOException {
    try (DirectoryStream<Path> ds = Files.newDirectoryStream(directory)) {
        for (Path child : ds) {
            all.add(child);
            if (Files.isDirectory(child)) {
                addTree(child, all);
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that the dreaded null return value has been replaced by IOException.

Java 7 also offers a tree walker:

static void addTree(Path directory, final Collection<Path> all)
        throws IOException {
    Files.walkFileTree(directory, new SimpleFileVisitor<Path>() {
        @Override
        public FileVisitResult visitFile(Path file, BasicFileAttributes attrs)
                throws IOException {
            all.add(file);
            return FileVisitResult.CONTINUE;
        }
    });
}
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I can't remember how much times I have wrote this code. :-P –  marcospereira Oct 10 '08 at 1:49
2  
Yeah it's like a recurring nightmare.. :P~ –  volley Oct 10 '08 at 5:41
    
I have to accept this answer since I asked for the tree (I had accepted the Oscar Reyes' answer first).. even though adding one more line for the recursion wasn't that hard :) –  Lipis Oct 11 '08 at 0:13
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import java.io.File;
public class Test {
    public static void main( String [] args ) {
        File actual = new File(".");
        for( File f : actual.listFiles()){
            System.out.println( f.getName() );
        }
    }
}

It displays indistinctly files and folders.

See the methods in File class to order them or avoid directory print etc.

http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/io/File.html

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Your anchor link is broken (I guess the markup system assumes parentheses can't be in hyperlinks). –  Michael Myers Oct 9 '08 at 20:41
    
Thanks. What about now? –  OscarRyz Oct 9 '08 at 20:47
    
hehe.. I should probably RTFM more often.. :) –  Lipis Oct 9 '08 at 20:54
    
If you put the link in a footnote, the one you had originally should actually work. (I know because I just did it in a different question.) –  Michael Myers Oct 9 '08 at 21:10
    
Actually, just putting angle brackets around it ought to do the trick. –  Michael Myers Oct 9 '08 at 21:21
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Check out Apache Commons FileUtils (listFiles, iterateFiles, etc.). Nice convenience methods for doing what you want and also applying filters.

http://commons.apache.org/io/api-1.4/org/apache/commons/io/FileUtils.html

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2  
There's nothing like sucking in a gargantuan library to solve a problem more slowly than might otherwise be solved with 10 lines of code. –  stu Jun 27 '11 at 18:24
7  
Ya, I hate using libraries that have been tested so much they contain functions more than 10 lines long. –  Casey Feb 23 '12 at 22:47
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You can also use the FileFilter interface to filter out what you want. It is best used when you create an anonymous class that implements it:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileFilter;

public class ListFiles {
    public File[] findDirectories(File root) { 
        return root.listFiles(new FileFilter() {
            public boolean accept(File f) {
                return f.isDirectory();
            }});
    }

    public File[] findFiles(File root) {
        return root.listFiles(new FileFilter() {
            public boolean accept(File f) {
                return f.isFile();
            }});
    }
}
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Visualizing the tree structure was the most convenient way for me :

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    printTree(0, new File("START/FROM/DIR"));
}

static void printTree(int depth, File file) throws IOException { 
    StringBuilder indent = new StringBuilder();
    String name = file.getName();

    for (int i = 0; i < depth; i++) {
        indent.append(".");
    }

    //Pretty print for directories
    if (file.isDirectory()) { 
        System.out.println(indent.toString() + "|");
        if(isPrintName(name)){
            System.out.println(indent.toString() + "*" + file.getName() + "*");
        }
    }
    //Print file name
    else if(isPrintName(name)) {
        System.out.println(indent.toString() + file.getName()); 
    }
    //Recurse children
    if (file.isDirectory()) { 
        File[] files = file.listFiles(); 
        for (int i = 0; i < files.length; i++){
            printTree(depth + 4, files[i]);
        } 
    }
}

//Exclude some file names
static boolean isPrintName(String name){
    if (name.charAt(0) == '.') {
        return false;
    }
    if (name.contains("svn")) {
        return false;
    }
    //.
    //. Some more exclusions
    //.
    return true;
}
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public static void directory(File dir){
    File[] files = dir.listFiles();
    for(File file:files){
        System.out.println(file.getAbsolutePath());
        if(file.listFiles() != null)
            directory(file);        
    }
} 

Here dir is Directory to be scanned. e.g c:\

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In JDK7, "more NIO features" should have methods to apply the visitor pattern over a file tree or just the immediate contents of a directory - no need to find all the files in a potentially huge directory before iterating over them.

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