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I am declaring the same variable name with @ and $:

@ask=(1..9);
$ask="insanity";
print ("Array @ask\n");
print ("Scalar $ask\n");

Without using use strict I am getting output correctly but when I am using use strict it gives me a compilation error.

Do these two variables refer to two different memory locations or is it the same variable?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You've got two variables:

@ask
$ask

You could have %ask (a hash) too if you wanted. Then you'd write:

print $ask, $ask[0], $ask{0};

to reference the scalar, the array and the hash.

Generally, you should avoid this treatment, but the variables are all quite distinct and Perl won't be confused.

The only reason use strict; is complaining is because you don't prefix your variables with my:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @ask = (1..9);
my $ask = "insanity";
my %ask = ( 0 => 'infinity', infinity => 0 );
print "Array @ask\n";
print "Scalar $ask\n";
print "Hash $ask{0}\n";
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"You could have %ask (a hash) too if you wanted." also '&ask' ;) –  MySZ Sep 20 '13 at 8:57
    
@MySZ: yes, you're correct; also *ask, which you might use indirectly with: open ask, '>', $ask or die; print ask @ask; — an old-style file handle, in other words. That gets warnings about 'bare words' ("Unquoted string "ask" may clash with future reserved word"), though. You used to use local(*ask); in a function to create (roughly) the equivalent of a lexical file handle, but lexical file handles are so much cleaner. I just didn't want to complicate things too much. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 20 '13 at 13:17
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with use strict; you need to declare your variables first before using it.

For example:

use strict;
my @ask=(1..9);
my $ask="insanity";
print ("Array @ask\n");
print ("Scalar $ask\n");
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Why down vote on this answer? –  Сухой27 Sep 20 '13 at 7:46
    
@mpapec I absolutly dont understand ; maybe it is the game ... I already received downvote for good answer by the past ... –  user1593705 Sep 20 '13 at 7:50
2  
It would be very kind of down voter to explain his action? –  Сухой27 Sep 20 '13 at 7:56
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@ask and $ask are different variables — as is %ask — and it is not an error to do this. It is however poor style.

Because the sigil changes when you use them, such as when you use $ask[1] to get the second element of @ask, the code becomes harder to read and use strict will also not be able to tell if you've gotten confused. Thus it's a good idea to use names that differ in more than the sigil unless you know what you're doing. So you could use e.g. @asks and $ask.

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The error you are getting with strict is not due to variable names. It is because you are not declaring the variables (using one of my, our, local, or state. Nor are you using the vars pragma.

Short answer: Stick a my in front of each variable, and you'll be strict-compliant.

For package variables, you can examine entries in the symbol table. $ask and @ask are separate entities:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use Devel::Symdump;
use YAML;

@ask=(1..9);
$ask="insanity";

my $st = Devel::Symdump->new('main');

print Dump [ $st->$_ ] for qw(
    scalars
    arrays
);

Among other things, this code will output:

--
…
- main::ask
…
---
…
- main::ask
…

Being able to use the same name can help when, say, you have an array of fish and you are doing something with each fish in the array:

for my $fish (@fish) {
   go($fish);
}

Normally, it is more expressive to use the plural form for arrays and hashes, the singular form for elements of an array, and something based on the singular form for keys in a hash:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @ships = ('Titanic', 'Costa Concordia');
my %ships = (
    'Titanic' => {
        maiden_voyage => '10 April 1912',
        capacity => 3_327,
    },
    'Costa Concordia' => {
        maiden_voyage => '14 July 2006',
        capacity => 4_880,
    },
);

for my $ship (@ships) {
    print "$ship\n";
}

while (my ($ship_name, $ship_details) = each %ships) {
    print "$ship_name capacity: $ship_details->{capacity}\n";
}
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