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I have a class with a large number of methods, the majority of which require that a single method is run first to populate a list in the class. However I'd also like to use lazy loading so that I can create instances without the initial load, until a method is called which requires the heavy loading. Therefore, I'd like to create a class where all methods are assumed to require the running of a given method, unless the method is selectively excluded. Here's my pseudo-code:

@all_methods_run_load
class myClass
    things = []
    params = []

    @dont_run_load
    def __init__(self, params):
      self.params = params

    @dont_run_load
    def load(self):
      self.things = do_a_ton_stuff()

    def get_things():
      return self.things

    def get_some_things():
      return apply_a_filter(self.things)

    def get_first_thing():
      return self.things[0]

    def get_last_thing():
      return self.things[-1]

Hopefully that makes sense. I'm pretty new to decorators themselves and still memorizing them, so I'm afraid the answer might blow my mind, however the thought crossed my mind and I can't help but investigate further :)

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm a little confused with what you're trying to achieve. If you want to have lazy loading why don't you have the functions that require the data call on a property that's only evaluated the first time?

class myClass
    _things = []
    params = []

    def __init__(self, params):
      self.params = params

    @property
    def things(self):
      if not self._things:
          self._things = do_a_ton_stuff()
      return self._things

    def get_things():
      return self.things

    def get_some_things():
      return apply_a_filter(self.things)

    def get_first_thing():
      return self.things[0]

    def get_last_thing():
      return self.things[-1]

Some people make a @cachedproperty decorator for this sort of pattern - so they don't have to do the self._things bit themselves. http://code.activestate.com/recipes/576563-cached-property/

share|improve this answer
    
Also convert all the other getters into properties. – Duncan Sep 20 '13 at 7:53
    
Oh yeah, why didn't I think of that ^_^. @Duncan What benefit would that conversion give? – DanH Sep 20 '13 at 8:21
2  
@DanH, in this case it just makes the code that uses it a bit cleaner; you can use instance.things, or instance.last_thing instead of instance.get_things() and instance.get_last_thing() so 6 fewer characters each time you access an attribute. In general though if you access attributes directly it leads to faster code as well as shorter, and then you can switch to using properties just for the cases like this one where they are needed and you don't need to rewrite the code that uses the attributes. – Duncan Sep 20 '13 at 9:17
    
I'd agree with Duncan's suggestions here. There's not really much need for the additional methods you have in there. People can read and understand obj.things[-1] just as fast as obj.last_thing - some_things, however, should probably be a property. – Aidan Kane Sep 20 '13 at 10:54

Although Aidan Kane is probably correct that you shouldn't be doing things this way, a solution to your stated problem could be phrased like so:

Here's the function that can decorate the methods.

import functools

def run_load(function):
    """Make a function run the class' load method before running."""
    @functools.wraps(function)
    def inner(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.load()
        return function(self, *args, **kwargs)
    return inner

Functions are mutable so you can just tag them.

def without_load(function):
    """Tag a method so that it shouldn't be decorated to call self.load."""
    function.without_load = True
    return function

You can decorate the class by just going through its members and setattr-ing them (found here).

import inspect

def decorate_all_with(decorator, predicate=None):
    """Apply a decorator to all methods that satisfy a predicate, if given."""

    if predicate is None:
        predicate = lambda _: True

    def decorate_all(cls):
        for name, method in inspect.getmembers(cls, inspect.isfunction):
            if predicate(method):
                setattr(cls, name, decorator(method))

        return cls

    return decorate_all

And that's it!

def should_be_loaded(function):
    try:
        return not bool(function.without_load)
    except AttributeError:
        return True

@decorate_all_with(run_load, should_be_loaded)
class MyClass:
        things = []
        params = []

        @without_load
        def __init__(self, params):
            self.params = params

        @without_load
        def load(self):
            self.things = do_a_ton_stuff()

        def get_things(self):
            return self.things

        def get_some_things(self):
            return apply_a_filter(self.things)

        def get_first_thing(self):
            return self.things[0]

        def get_last_thing(self):
            return self.things[-1]
share|improve this answer
    
Really cool thanks, but I agree with you that Aidan Kane's view point is probably the best route. Great to read through your solution though :) – DanH Sep 20 '13 at 8:40

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