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I have a set of users of different types, each type has individual set of fields storing user settings. My thought was to store user_id and user_type in one table with common set of fields and to move other settings to a separate tables. But the problem is how to link user from common table with his details in separate table. I see one solution is to store table name associated with certain user type in another table. But is it the best solution?

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`user` (
  `user_id` INT NOT NULL,
  `user_name` INT NOT NULL,
  `user_type` INT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`, `user_name`),
  UNIQUE INDEX `adv_id_UNIQUE` (`user_id` ASC),
  INDEX `adv_type_idx` (`user_type` ASC),
  CONSTRAINT `adv_type`
    FOREIGN KEY (`user_type`)
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`user_type` (`type_id`)
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`user_type` (
  `type_id` INT NOT NULL,
  `type_table` VARCHAR(45) NULL,
  UNIQUE INDEX `type_id_UNIQUE` (`type_id` ASC),
  PRIMARY KEY (`type_id`))

//TABLES WITH SEPARATE SET OF FIELDS

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`user_details_admin` (
  `user_id` INT NOT NULL,
  `user_admin` VARCHAR(45) NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`))

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`user_details_moderator` (
  `user_id` INT NOT NULL,
  `user_moderator` VARCHAR(45) NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`user_id`))
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This appears to be a situation where you want to model inheritance in your database.

Rather than storing the user_details_ table names in the user_types table, something akin to the following may serve you better:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS 'mydb'.'user' (
'user_id' INT NOT NULL,
'type_id' INT NOT NULL,
'commonfield1' datatype (NOT) NULL,
'commonfield2' datatype (NOT) NULL,
'commonfield...' datatype (NOT) NULL,
PRIMARY KEY ('user_id', (other field as needed)),
UNIQUE INDEX 'adv_id_UNIQUE' ('user_id' ASC),
INDEX 'adv_type_idx' ('type_id' ASC),
CONSTRAINT 'adv_type'
  FOREIGN KEY ('type_id')
  REFERENCES 'mydb'.'user_type' ('type_id')
  ON DELETE NO ACTION
  ON UPDATE NO ACTION)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS 'mydb'.'user_type' (
'type_id' INT NOT NULL,
'type_name' VARCHAR(45) NOT NULL,
UNIQUE INDEX 'type_id_UNIQUE' ('type_id' ASC),
UNIQUE INDEX 'type_name_UNIQUE' ('type_name' ASC),
PRIMARY KEY ('type_id'))

//TABLES WITH SEPARATE SET OF FIELDS

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS 'mydb'.'user_details_admin' (
'user_id' INT NOT NULL,
'type_id' INT NOT NULL,
'adminfield1' datatype (NOT) NULL,
'adminfield...' datatype  (NOT) NULL,
PRIMARY KEY ('user_id'))
CONSTRAINT user_type_FK
  FOREIGN KEY ('user_id', 'type_id')
  REFERENCES 'mydb'.'user' ('user_id', 'type_id')
  ON DELETE NO ACTION
  ON UPDATE NO ACTION)

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS 'mydb'.'user_details_moderator' (
'user_id' INT NOT NULL,
'type_id' INT NOT NULL,
'moderatorfield1' datatype (NOT) NULL,
'moderatorfield...' datatype  (NOT) NULL,
PRIMARY KEY ('user_id'))
CONSTRAINT user_type_FK
  FOREIGN KEY ('user_id', 'type_id')
  REFERENCES 'mydb'.'user' ('user_id', 'type_id')
  ON DELETE NO ACTION
  ON UPDATE NO ACTION)

This design assumes that a user may be of one and only one type. You'll need to insure that, for example, a moderator is only added to the user_details_moderator table using triggers or views, and/or by handling it in your application code. MySQL doesn't implement check constraints on tables. You'll likely want to create views, anyway, in order to avoid having to write the JOIN between the user table and the sub-type tables every time you want to query a specific sub-type.

Note: The INDEX on type_id in the user table may not be useful or necessary.

This is not the only way to model your data. If you have few fields that are distinct between types and/or are willing to have fields you know will be NULL in your table, you can just add all the fields to the user table. Other than the a priori NULL fields issue, a major difference between these approaches comes with the addition of a new user_type with new distinct fields. In the example I provided, you would need to add a new table. In the single-table design, you would need to add new nullable fields to the user table. Which is easier to maintain is really up to you, but I personally prefer the table-per-type design because in my uses adding a table is relatively trivial and I dislike intentionally adding fields that I know will contain NULL 'values' without serious optimization advantages (that don't exist in my case, but might in yours).

See also How do you effectively model inheritance in a database?, and/or search for "inheritance" under the tag for further information.

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I also just found this link again: Implementing Table Inheritance in SQL Server. It's SQL Server, not MySQL, but the general concepts apply across the board –  algadban Sep 21 '13 at 19:00
    
Thanks. This helped me a lot. Will get into reading. –  Vitaly Mirsky Sep 21 '13 at 19:26

I think creating a user_type_parameters with columns user_id, parameter_key, parameter_value could be an interesting solution as it would give you more flexibility.

the parameter_key column would be the name of some parameter like one of the columns on the user_details_admin table, and on the parameter_value column you would inster its correspondent value.

Of course on the application side you would have to know what keys to expect for each user type.

please fell free to ask if you have any doubts about my explanation.

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Thanks for your help. I think algadban`s answer will fit my case better. But I really appreciate your time. –  Vitaly Mirsky Sep 21 '13 at 19:25

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