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I trying to finish my code.after allocate memory for the arrays. i got few errors and because of them i can't compile the code. I would like to get your help to finish the program thanks!

1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(27): error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(28): error C2065: 'text2' : undeclared identifier
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(28): warning C4047: '=' : 'int' differs in levels of indirection from 'char **'
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(29): error C2065: 'text2' : undeclared identifier
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(36): error C2065: 'text2' : undeclared identifier
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(36): error C2109: subscript requires array or pointer type
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(38): error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(47): error C2065: 'text2' : undeclared identifier
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(47): error C2109: subscript requires array or pointer type
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(47): error C2198: 'gets' : too few arguments for call
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(50): error C2065: 'text2' : undeclared identifier
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(50): warning C4047: 'function' : 'char **' differs in levels of indirection from 'int'
1>c:\users\roni\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\lb11_12\lb11_12\lb_11_12_02.c(50): warning C4024: 'PrintStr2' : different types for formal and actual parameter 1
========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

This is my code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <malloc.h>
#define LINES 4
#define length 100

void SortText1(char **text1);
void SortText2(char **text2);
void PrintStr1(char **text1);
void PrintStr2(char **text2);
void main (){
    int i;
    char **text1;
    text1=(char **)malloc(LINES*sizeof(char *));    
    if(!text1){ // Terms - if there is not enough memory,print error msg and exit the program.  
        printf("alloc failed\n");
        return ;
    }

    for (i=0 ; i<LINES; i++){
        text1[i] =(char*) malloc(length*sizeof(char));
    }

    char **text2;
    text2=(char **)malloc(LINES*sizeof(char *));
    if(!text2){ // Terms - if there is not enough memory,print error msg and exit the program.  
        printf("alloc failed\n");
        return ;
    }

    for (i=0 ; i<LINES; i++){
        text2[i] =(char*) malloc(length*sizeof(char));
    }

    char text3[LINES+LINES][length];
    printf("First string,Please enter %d names (only capital letters,without spaces):", LINES);
    for ( i=0 ; i<LINES ; i++){
        gets(text1[i]);
    }

    printf("Second string,Please enter %d names (only capital letters,without spaces):", LINES);
    for ( i=0 ; i<LINES ; i++){
        gets(text2[i]);
    }

    PrintStr1(text1);
    PrintStr2(text2);
    SortText1(text1);
    system("pause");
    return ;
}
void SortText1(char **text1){   
    int i,j,k;
    for (i=LINES-1 ; i>0 ; i--){
        for ( j=0 ; j<i ; j++ ){
            if(strcmp(text1[i],text1[i+1]) > 0 ){
                char *temp=text1[i+1];
                text1[i+1]=text1[i];
                text1[i]=temp;
            }
        }
    }

    printf("The first string sorted:\n");
    for ( k=0 ; i<LINES ; k++){
        printf("%s ",text1[k]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}

void PrintStr1(char **text1){
    int i;
    printf("The first string of NAMES:\n");
    for ( i=0 ; i<LINES ; i++){
        printf("%s ",text1[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}
void PrintStr2(char **text2){
    int i;
    printf("The second string of NAMES:\n");
    for ( i=0 ; i<LINES ; i++){
        printf("%s ",text2[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
}
share|improve this question
2  
If you want us to look at the line numbers in the errors, please include line numbers in the source. It would be ideal if you could make a smaller example that exhibits the same problem. –  robbie_c Sep 20 '13 at 9:12
    
possible duplicate of error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type' –  Zeta Sep 20 '13 at 9:17
1  
How do i add line numbers? –  Sagi Binder Sep 20 '13 at 9:21
    
I don't get any errors when I compile your code with mingw, but double check the line that says for ( k=0 ; i<LINES ; k++) –  DanielV Sep 20 '13 at 9:21
    
Oh nevermind. It's ansi C not c99. I'll explain in a longer comment. –  DanielV Sep 20 '13 at 9:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are getting these errors because you declare your local variables not in the beginning of the scope.

     for (i=0 ; i<LINES; i++)
     {
        text1[i] =(char*) malloc(length*sizeof(char));
     }
   char **text2; // <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
    text2=(char **)malloc(LINES*sizeof(char *));

The capability to declare variables in the middle of the scope was first introduced in C99 standard, which is not supported by MS compilers.

Move all the local variable declarations to be after { and before any other statements in the block they are used in.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks i changed what u told my but i got a new error! when i am about to get into the if(strcmp(text1[i],text1[i+1]) > 0 ) i get an error msg "Unhandled exception at 0x53e3d442 (msvcr100d.dll) in LB11_12.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0xfdfdfdfd." –  Sagi Binder Sep 20 '13 at 9:29
    
Yes, but make another posting of that error, it should have with text3 to do –  Anders Lindén Sep 20 '13 at 9:31

Your compiler seems to use an older version of the C standard. It does not allow declarations in the middle of a block. You need to move all declarations up so they all come before the first executable statement of the block.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks i changed what u told my but i got a new error! when i am about to get into the if(strcmp(text1[i],text1[i+1]) > 0 ) i get an error msg "Unhandled exception at 0x53e3d442 (msvcr100d.dll) in LB11_12.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0xfdfdfdfd." –  Sagi Binder Sep 20 '13 at 9:33
    
I suggest you ask a separate question about this error. –  n.m. Sep 20 '13 at 9:36

To be sure, specify local variables only in the start of a function body. Else, the C compiler could give you a compilation error.

share|improve this answer
    
This was once true many years ago, anyway. –  aschepler Sep 20 '13 at 9:16
1  
@aschepler: Apparently it's still true for VS in C mode: stackoverflow.com/questions/15697190/… –  Zeta Sep 20 '13 at 9:17
1  
not necessarily a function body. You can specify them after any '{' in the code. –  Maksim Skurydzin Sep 20 '13 at 9:18
1  
Without specifying conditions this answer is wrong. –  zubergu Sep 20 '13 at 9:20
    
VS compile C code with a very old standard by default. The condition zubergu asks may be these standard things. –  johan d. Sep 20 '13 at 9:23

In C89, you can only put declaration of variables in the beginning of a block. This limitation has been removed in C99.

But Visual Studio 2010 doesn't support C99 yet. So you have to stick to the C89 style:

int main ()        //use int main()
{
    int i;
    char **text1;
    char **text2;  //Put all the declarations in the beginning
    // ...
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Older standards of C won't let you do this (where C++ and newer C standards do). You can work with it though by introducing a new body:

void function()
{
    int i;

    i = 0;

    // Do some more things
    {
        int AnotherInt = 33;
        AnotherInt += i; // Can still reference i here
    }

    // AnotherInt is now "out of scope" and cannot be referenced any more
}
share|improve this answer
    
Answer modified. Thanks! –  noelicus Sep 20 '13 at 9:27

In ansi C, that is c89, you have to declare all of your variables in a function before anything else.

Main should be changed to

void main ()
{
    int i;
    char **text1;
    char **text2;
    char text3[LINES+LINES][length];

    // put the rest of your code here

}

If you want to declare variables in the middle of code, you have to use c99 (or maybe your compiler has another option for it).

/Everything after this is nitpicking.

As a matter of style, you should capitalize #define constants like length. And you should declare your functions static so they don't pollute global namespace:

static void SortText1(char **text1);
static void SortText2(char **text2);
static void PrintStr1(char **text1);
static void PrintStr2(char **text2);

Main should be int main(int argv, char** argc) instead of void main() You don't need to include malloc.h and conio.h unless your compiler doesn't define the standard libraries correctly.

for ( k=0 ; i<LINES ; k++)

should change the i to a k.

Indenting is inconsistent.

Also you should write your programs one small piece at a time. Writing many functions and then trying to compile them will lead to problems like this. If you are copying someone else's homework then of course you'll just be compiling some huge page of fail, but if you write this on your own it will be much faster to use short pieces of code in between compilations.

/end nitpicking

Good luck with your project.

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