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I am tryng to draw a circular countdown around an image (an arc which will decrease its end angle above an other arc which will still static).

I have to clip after drawing the static and the dynamic arc to draw the image into it. But the problem is, the image is drawing into the dynamical arc (so we don't fully see it).

Here is the code and a JsFiddle:

<canvas id="test" width="230px", height="230px"></canvas>    
var ctx = document.getElementById('test').getContext("2d");
var img = new Image();
img.addEventListener('load', function(e) {
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(115, 115, 100, 0, Math.PI * 2, true);
    ctx.closePath();
    ctx.lineWidth = 15; 
    ctx.strokeStyle = 'back'; 
    ctx.stroke();

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(115, 115, 100, 0, 1*Math.PI, true);
    ctx.closePath();
    ctx.lineWidth = 15; 
    ctx.strokeStyle = 'red'; 
    ctx.stroke();

    ctx.clip();

    ctx.drawImage(this, 15, 15, 200, 200);
}, true);
img.src="https://si0.twimg.com/profile_images/3309741408/eff94615a3653c01a9d5a178ced7fbb5.jpeg";

JsFiddle

UPDATE: Here is something very close about what i am looking for: JsFiddle updated, except the red arc appears in a very bad way...

share|improve this question
    
is this something like this you're after ? jsfiddle.net/tqs2y/1 –  GameAlchemist Sep 20 '13 at 10:15
    
@GameAlchemist Not really but almost, i just want the "border" (the arc) to play the countdown, like in a poker game, you can see the user's avatar but a circular countdown is playing around its avatar when it's his turn to play (whithout showing/hidding the image). –  Ludo Sep 20 '13 at 11:20
    
@GameAlchemist Here is something very close about what i am looking for: jsfiddle.net/tqs2y/4 –  Ludo Sep 20 '13 at 12:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Order matters

You are very close and only need to change orders of things a little (I hope I understood your intention correctly):

I would recommend to do the clipping with a full circle first because this won't obscure what is drawn on top of it (if you clip later you might clip of the arc as well - unless you want to do this).

Set and reset a clipping mask

Resetting a clipping mask turns out to be a bit "unstable", ie. setting a new path and a rectangle that covers the entire canvas. So the better choice in this case for the moment is to rely on the save/restore approach to reset it:

/// backup current state of canvas
ctx.save();

/// create clipping mask, a full circle
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(115, 115, 100, 0, Math.PI * 2);
ctx.closePath();
ctx.clip();

/// then draw the image that you want to clip
ctx.drawImage(this, 15, 15, 200, 200);

/// remove clipping by restoring canvas state to previous
ctx.restore();

Unbound overlays

Now the image is clipped into a circle you can draw your arcs without considering or re-calculating line widths etc. in relation to image as they are not bound to clipping:

/// draw the arcs on top
ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(115, 115, 100, 0, Math.PI * 2, true);
ctx.lineWidth = 15; 
ctx.strokeStyle = 'red'; 
ctx.stroke();

ctx.beginPath();
ctx.arc(115, 115, 100, 0, 1*Math.PI, true);
ctx.lineWidth = 15; 
ctx.strokeStyle = 'blue'; 
ctx.stroke();

MODIFIED FIDDLE HERE

share|improve this answer

You can use context.save / context.restore to control your clipping activities

enter image description hereenter image description here

This is one way to do it:

      // outer circle
      ctx.beginPath();
      ctx.arc(150,150,40,0,2*PI, false);
      ctx.closePath();
      ctx.lineWidth=20;
      ctx.strokeStyle="black";
      ctx.stroke();

      // inner sweeping arc
      ctx.beginPath();
      ctx.arc(150,150,40, startRadians, endRadians, false);
      ctx.lineWidth=10;
      ctx.strokeStyle="red";
      ctx.stroke();

      // clipped avatar
      ctx.save();
      ctx.beginPath();
      ctx.arc(150,150,30,0,2*PI, false);
      ctx.closePath();
      ctx.clip();
      ctx.drawImage(avatar,0,0,avatar.width,avatar.height,150-40,150-40,80,80);
      ctx.restore();

Here is code and a Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/m1erickson/j96yy/

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="css/reset.css" /> <!-- reset css -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js"></script>

<style>
    body{ background-color: ivory; padding:20px; }
    canvas{border:1px solid red;}
</style>

<script>
$(function(){

    var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
    var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');

    window.requestAnimFrame = (function(callback) {
      return window.requestAnimationFrame || window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame || window.mozRequestAnimationFrame || window.oRequestAnimationFrame || window.msRequestAnimationFrame ||
      function(callback) {
        window.setTimeout(callback, 1000 / 60);
      };
    })();


    // set context styles
    ctx.strokeStyle = '#ff9944';
    ctx.lineCap = 'round';

    // set var's to control arc
    var PI=Math.PI;
    var startRadians=-PI/2;
    var endRadians=-PI/2;
    var tickRadians=2*PI/60/2;  // 60 ticks per circle
    var continue_animation = true;

    // load avatar image, then animate
    var avatar=new Image();
    avatar.onload=function(){
        animate();
    }
    avatar.src="avatar.jpg";


    // animate an arc inside a circle
    function animate() { 

      // update
      endRadians+=tickRadians;
      if(endRadians>2*PI){
          continue_animation=false;
      }

      ctx.clearRect(0,0,canvas.width,canvas.height);


      // outer circle
      ctx.beginPath();
      ctx.arc(150,150,40,0,2*PI, false);
      ctx.closePath();
      ctx.lineWidth=20;
      ctx.strokeStyle="black";
      ctx.stroke();

      // inner sweeping arc
      ctx.beginPath();
      ctx.arc(150,150,40, startRadians, endRadians, false);
      ctx.lineWidth=10;
      ctx.strokeStyle="red";
      ctx.stroke();

      // clipped avatar
      ctx.save();
      ctx.beginPath();
      ctx.arc(150,150,30,0,2*PI, false);
      ctx.closePath();
      ctx.clip();
      ctx.drawImage(avatar,0,0,avatar.width,avatar.height,150-40,150-40,80,80);
      ctx.restore();

      // request new frame
      if(continue_animation){requestAnimFrame(animate);}
    }

    $("#go").click(function(){
        endRadians=-PI/2;
        continue_animation=true;
        animate();
    });

}); // end $(function(){});
</script>

</head>

<body>
    <button id="go">Animate</button><br>
    <canvas id="canvas" width="300" height="300"></canvas>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very interesting ! I finally did it this way: jsfiddle.net/tqs2y/7 but i will look further how to play with save/restore way –  Ludo Sep 20 '13 at 16:58
    
Nice touch with the green/amber/red arc! Glad you got it sorted. BTW, you might look at this article which shows how to use requestAnimationFrame + setTimeout instead of setInterval. RAF provides much better performance and is the way web animation is headed: creativejs.com/resources/requestanimationframe –  markE Sep 20 '13 at 17:17

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