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I have read Is std::unique_ptr<T> required to know the full definition of T? and Forward declaration with unique_ptr?, but my question is more specific.

The following compiles:

// Compile with $ g++ -std=c++11 -c <filename>
#include <memory>
class A; // fwd declaration

class AUser
{
  AUser();  // defined elsewhere
  ~AUser(); // defined elsewhere
  std::unique_ptr<A> m_a;
};

The following doesn't:

// Compile with $ g++ -std=c++11 -c <filename>
#include <memory>
class A; // fwd declaration

class AUser
{
  AUser();  // defined elsewhere
  ~AUser(); // defined elsewhere
  std::unique_ptr<A> m_a{nullptr};
};

The error

$ g++ -std=c++11 -c fwd_decl_u_ptr.cpp 
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.7/memory:86:0,
                 from fwd_decl_u_ptr.cpp:3:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/unique_ptr.h: In instantiation of ‘void std::default_delete<_Tp>::operator()(_Tp*) const [with _Tp = A]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/unique_ptr.h:173:4:   required from ‘std::unique_ptr<_Tp, _Dp>::~unique_ptr() [with _Tp = A; _Dp = std::default_delete<A>]’
fwd_decl_u_ptr.cpp:9:33:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/unique_ptr.h:63:14: error: invalid application of ‘sizeof’ to incomplete type ‘A’

EDIT: As far as I understand, what is happening here is that the in-class initializer implies being capable of initializing unique_ptr<A> already at the moment of declaration of AUser. Since the type unique_ptr<A> is actually unique_ptr<A, default_delete<A>>, being able to initialize it implies being able to initialize default_delete<A>. And, for that, A has to be fully defined.

The weak link in this reasoning is the assumption that the in-class initializer implies capability of initializing the respective data member at the moment of declaration of the class! This seems an intuitive self-evidence, since the initializer is part of the declaration. But I would be more comfortable if I found something in the standard explicitly stating that. Otherwise I can still think of implementation solutions that wouldn't require it. For instance, the compiler could simply take the initializer expression and apply it only in constructors where the initialization of the attribute wasn't explicitly given.

So, can anyone refer me to a standard section/excerpt that implies the necessity for the full definition of A in the second case? I didn't find much about in-class initializers in the standard (only found them referred to as "brace-or-equal-initializers of non-static data members"), but nothing related to this.

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2  
What's the error in the second case? – Kiril Kirov Sep 20 '13 at 10:45
    
Also: ideone.com/p2iPsv - seems like the first one causes problems, too. – Kiril Kirov Sep 20 '13 at 10:48
1  
@KirilKirov It causes problems because you haven't defined class A... – magor Sep 20 '13 at 10:52
    
@KirilKirov: If you try to produce the executable without having defined A you obviously get problems. However if you compile only the fragment (of course assuming the definition of A will be provided somewhere else) you don't. I will update the original post with the error. – ricab Sep 20 '13 at 10:52
    
@Everybody - right, right, my bad :) – Kiril Kirov Sep 20 '13 at 10:55

The second case generate the default destructor [incorrect] in the place of AUser definition [/incorrect] (in this case, it is actually done after processing whole code). The same as a definition of a constructor inside AUser would do.

Still in any case you need to provide a definition of A in the same compilation unit. So maybe just something like this will satisfy you?

#include <memory>

class A;

class AUser
{
  std::unique_ptr<A> m_a;
  AUser();
};


class A
{
  // ...
};


AUser::AUser() 
  : m_a(nullptr)
{ }
share|improve this answer
    
That's the point, I didn't define any constructor so why should the destructor be defined – ricab Sep 21 '13 at 13:35
    
Actually, adding a default value involves implicate extension of constructors (the value needs to be set when an object is created and a constructor is responsible for this, so some code need to be added to it). Thus in your second case you force redefinition of a default constructor and so the default destructor is also defined. -- This may be gcc specific, that it is done at this point, and maybe another compiler will generate the constructor and destructor just before first use of AUser. But any way, it needs to be done. – Number47 Sep 21 '13 at 14:36
    
Sorry your argument is a bit confusing. I don't get what you mean by "adding a default value involves implicate extension of constructors", nor by "you force redefinition of a default constructor", particularly when you then say "This may be gcc specific". – ricab Sep 23 '13 at 12:38
    
Using an in-class initializer does not equate to defining a ctor. In fact I could still define the default constructor and even overwrite m_a, and I could also define 10 other constructors that made use of the in-class initializer. There is nothing in your answer that proving the destructor of AUser has to be immediately generated in the second case. You're assuming things that may or may not make sense, but you're not showing why the compiler had to do it that way. – ricab Sep 23 '13 at 12:47
    
It didn't have to. As I said, it could wait till the first use of AUser object. It was choice of gcc, which was PROBABLY (I am not so deep into gcc to know such details) triggered, because you "touched" constructors. What you have done by adding the initializer is actually translated to additional entry m_a{nullptr} in initialization lists of all constructors except the copy one. Unless you specify an entry for m_a in a constructor by yourself. This makes, the default constructor had to be extended with this entry in your case. – Number47 Sep 23 '13 at 19:30

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