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It 's a very simple question... at the first glance. And not so simple at the second. :-/

There are two divs: #content and #sidebar (in this order!) which are contained in a div #main. The #content div may have a very long tables or strings, and must not crop them or increase width of itself, so overflow:hidden and any kinds of flow is not allowed. The #sidebar div may be higher then #content. The #main div must have a height of the highest div inside, so "position: absolute; top: 0;" for #sidebar is not a solution.

The question: is it possible to set a #sidebar div to the left of #content div while not using any kind of float for #content and keeping all divs totally inside of #main?

I have made an illustration here: http://jsfiddle.net/dZLmu/

HTML

<div id="main">
    <div id="content">
        <p>It's a content area. It can contain a very long
            tables or strings which must not be cropped by
            overflow: hidden and must no extend a width of
            div itself. Something like that:</p>
        <p>WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW</p>
    </div>
    <div id="sidebar">
        <p>It's a sidebar.</p>
        <p>It can be higher then content area.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
    </div>
    <div id="clearfix"></div>
</div>

CSS

#main {
    background-color: silver;
    margin: 0 auto;
    widht: 500px;
    #position: relative;
}

#content {
    background-color: green;
    margin-left: 100px;
}

#sidebar {
    background-color: red;
    float: left;
    width: 100px;
    #position: absolute;
    #top: 0;
}

#clearfix {
    clear: both;
}
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By setting absolute positions for the #sidebar and #content you should be able to make them adjacent with no problems. I would suggest that you set both elements as height:100% so that the smaller of the two will match the larger. You should also consider using new CSS3 elements like <header>, <aside>, <main> and <footer>. –  DevlshOne Sep 20 '13 at 12:38
    
The answer really depends on what you are OK with and some of the reasoning behind not using floats. Can you not set a specific width for the content area? Or simply use percentages? What sort of browser support do you need? Can you use flexbox, or calc(), for example? –  robooneus Sep 20 '13 at 12:39
    
This is using DevlshOne's recommendations: jsfiddle.net/Morlock0821/Tdwjx/1 –  Pedro Estrada Sep 20 '13 at 12:41
    
@DevlshOne: In that case I have to set a certain height for the #main div? It's not always possible. And I still have to support 8% of our visitors with IE 8. :-( –  Alexey Markov Sep 20 '13 at 13:17
    
@robooneus: Yes, a #content div width is (#main - #sidebar) and may be specified in px or %. So pity I still have to support IE8. :-( –  Alexey Markov Sep 20 '13 at 13:25
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4 Answers

Like this

demo

css

#main {
    background-color: silver;
    margin: 0 auto;
    display:table;
}
#content {
    background-color: green;  
    display:table-cell;
    word-break:break-all;

}

#sidebar {
    background-color: red; 
    width: 100px;  
   display:table-cell;

}

#clearfix {
    clear: both;
}

demo1

share|improve this answer
    
There are two drawbacks for this solution: "word-break" doesn't work for a long tables inside the #content and layout itself can't be "adaptive" for using on a small screens. –  Alexey Markov Sep 20 '13 at 13:44
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Probably the simplest thing would simply be to apply specific widths to both the #sidebar and #content elements, either as a percentage or pixel width (if you give the wrapper a set width). If you cannot specify a width for #content, but want to use floats, you can use calc().

fiddle

#content {
    float:right;
    width:calc(100% - 100px);
}

Where you simply subtract the width of the #sidebar element. This is not compatible with IE8, however. Check caniuse.com

This is simply meant as an alternative to other answers, based on what might fit the actual use-case

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A possible solution:

#content {
    background-color: green;
    display: inline-block;
    max-width: 100%;
    border-left: 100px solid transparent;
    -moz-box-sizing: border-box;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}

#sidebar {
    background-color: red;
    float: left;
    width: 100px;
    margin-right: -100%;
    position: relative; 
}

What happens here? First, setting display:inline-block to #content changes the formatting context where #content lives from block to inline (containers becomes one-line text with one big word that contains the entire block of content inside). Then, we limit its outer height and add a transparent border that emulates margin and holds the place for the floating column. And last, we make the floating div take no horizontal place (by setting large negative margin) and change its effective z-index by setting relative position to it.

But wouldn't it easier just to swap two divs in the source code, so that sidebar comes first?

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Very interesting solution! I'll thoroughly test it at home. Thanks! –  Alexey Markov Sep 20 '13 at 13:49
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The usual method when not using floats is to use display: inline-block: http://www.jsfiddle.net/zygnz/1/

CSS Code

.container div {
  display: inline-block;
}

HTML Code

<div class="container">
<div id="content">
        <p>It's a content area. It can contain a very long
            tables or strings which must not be cropped by
            overflow: hidden and must no extend a width of
            div itself. Something like that:</p>
        <p>WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW</p>
    </div>
    <div id="sidebar">
        <p>It's a sidebar.</p>
        <p>It can be higher then content area.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
        <p>Menu item #.</p>
    </div>
</div>

Do note its limitations though: There is a additional space after the first bloc - this is because the two blocks are now essentially inline elements, like a and em, so whitespace between the two counts. This could break your layout and/or not look nice, and I'd prefer not to strip out all whitespaces between characters for the sake of this working.

Floats are also more flexible, in most cases.

Setting display attribute to table-cell also works display:table-cell;

Hope this Helps

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