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I want to test the behavior of a singleton class with following methods:

public class SomeSingleton
{
    private final static int DEFAULT_VALUE1 = ...;
    private final static int DEFAULT_VALUE2 = ...;

    private static SomeSingleton instance;

    public static void init(int value1, int value2)
    {
        if (instance != null)
        {
            throw new IllegalStateException("SomeSingleton already initialized");
        }

        instance = new SomeSingleton(value1, value2);
    }

    public static getInstance()
    {
        if (instance == null)
        {
            init(DEFAULT_VALUE1, DEFAULT_VALUE2);
        }

        return instance;
    }
}

And then I have a test class with several test methods, which invoke init several times:

@RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class)
@PrepareForTest(SomeSingleton.class)
public class SomeSingletonTest {
    @Test
    public void testGetInstanceSunnyDay()
    {
        [...]
        SomeSingleton.init(...);
        [...]
        SomeSingleton.getInstance();
        [...]
    }

    @Test
    public void testGetInstanceRainyDay()
    {
        [...]
        SomeSingleton.init(...); // IllegalStateException
        [...]
        SomeSingleton.getInstance();
        [...]
    }
}

When I do it this way, I always get the IllegalStateException in the second test because instance != null.

How can I run several tests involving init in one test class?

Putting testGetInstanceSunnyDay and testGetInstanceRainyDay in 2 separate classes solves the problem, but I'm wondering if there is a better solution.

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What benefits do you suppose a singleton offers here that, say, an immutable class wouldn't? –  Duncan Sep 20 '13 at 13:29
    
The singleton is part of an old code base. I didn't write it. For now, I just want to capture the behavior of that legacy code in unit tests. And then gradually improve the design of the application. –  Dmitri Pisarenko Sep 20 '13 at 13:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Although I agree with Jon, the other option is to use ReflectionTestUtils or reflection in general to set the instance field to null. Knowing that this can be brittle if the field name changes.

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Fundamentally singletons are hard to test, precisely because of this sort of thing. You could add a clearStateForTesting method:

static void clearStateForTesting() {
    instance = null;
}

... but I'd suggest that you avoid the singleton pattern in the first place, if possible.

Also note that your singleton implementation isn't thread-safe at the moment. There are significantly better implementations if you really need to use a singleton.

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Another similar option would be to use reflection to set the instance field to null. –  John B Sep 20 '13 at 13:27
    
@JohnB: Indeed - I try to avoid using reflection in tests where possible though. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '13 at 13:29
    
Agree. Sucky tradeoff between using reflection which is brittle and adding a method to the class that is for testing reasons only. Either way not great. Cheers. –  John B Sep 20 '13 at 13:30
    
@JohnB From my subjective point of view, reflection is the best option in this case. Please submit your comment as an answer and I'll accept it. –  Dmitri Pisarenko Sep 20 '13 at 13:33
1  
@DmitriPisarenko: Do you want your tests to break if you change the private field name? That sounds very brittle to me. But hey, I would try to avoid the singleton to start with :) Note that the presence of a "only present for testing" method makes it really clear to anyone reading the code just what's required to test this code. It would also be more reusable if other code using the singleton needs to test different configurations. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '13 at 13:36

Given that it is a Singleton, the init method makes no sense as a public method. Make it private and use only getInstance in your unit tests.

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