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I have a stress test for server setup and tear-down. The main thread is the server thread, and the other thread is a client thread.

In the client thread, I call socket(), connect(), send(), recv(), shutdown(), then close(), all in a tight loop. I am intentionally creating lots of little connections. This loop terminates when any of my socket calls error out.

In the main thread, I call listen(), then launch the client thread. I accept() a small number of connections, and on each one of those connections, I call recv() once, and send() once before calling shutdown() and close() on the accepted socket. I then shutdown() and close() the listening socket, and join with the client thread.

Roughly once every 1500 iterations, my client thread will get stuck on recv() andt he main thread is stuck() in pthread_join(client_thread). "netstat -n -p tcp" shows two TCP/IP entries in ESTABLISHED, one for each side of the connection. My debug prints indicate that a successful client connection happened at almost the exact same time as the close() call on my listening socket. No call to accept() was made on the server for that client connection. If I then CTRL-C the program, the client side goes into FIN_WAIT_2, and the server side goes into CLOSE_WAIT. The FIN_WAIT_2 eventually goes away, but CLOSE_WAIT hangs around, even after a logout / login.

#include <iostream>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/un.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netinet/tcp.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <errno.h>

struct addrinfo *res = 0;
int count = 0;

struct tSocketCloser {
  int s;
  ~tSocketCloser() {
    printf("clientClosing: %d\n", s);
    shutdown(s, SHUT_RDWR);
    close(s);
    printf("clientClosed: %d\n", s);
  }
};

int start_server() {
  int listenSocket = -1;

  listenSocket = socket(res->ai_family, res->ai_socktype, res->ai_protocol);
  printf("listenSocket: %d\n", listenSocket);
  int ret = 0;
  int one = 1;
  ret = ::setsockopt(listenSocket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &one, sizeof(one));
  if(ret)
  {
    printf("SO_REUSEADDR %d\n", ret);
    exit(-1);
  }
  /* SO_LINGER {1,0} and TCP_NODELAY were here */
  // O_NONBLOCK code was here

  ret = ::bind(listenSocket, res->ai_addr, static_cast<int>(res->ai_addrlen));
  if(ret)
  {
    printf("Bind %d\n", ret);
    exit(-1);
  }
  ret = ::listen(listenSocket, 1024);
  if (ret)
  {
    printf("listen %d\n", ret);
    exit(-1);
  }
  return listenSocket;
}

void stop_server(int listenSocket) {
  int iters = rand() % 3;
  for(int i = 0; i < iters; ++i)
  {
    struct sockaddr_storage clientAddress;
    int size = sizeof(clientAddress);
    tSocketCloser otherSock;
    otherSock.s = ::accept(
      listenSocket,
      (struct sockaddr *) &clientAddress,
      (socklen_t *) &size);
    printf("accept: %d\n", otherSock.s);

    int ret = 0;
    int one = 1;
    ret = setsockopt(otherSock.s, SOL_SOCKET, SO_NOSIGPIPE, &one, sizeof(one));
    if(ret)
    {
      printf("SO_NOSIGPIPE %d\n", ret);
      break;
    }
    char buffer[2048] = {0};
    ret = recv(otherSock.s, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0);
    if(ret == -1)
      break;
    ret = send(otherSock.s, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0);
    if(ret == -1)
      break;
  }
  int sleep_time = abs(rand()%1000);
  usleep(sleep_time);

  printf("serverClosing: %d\n", listenSocket);
  shutdown(listenSocket, SHUT_RDWR);
  close(listenSocket);
  printf("serverClosed: %d\n", listenSocket);
}

void *short_connect(void *)
{
  while(true) {
    ++count;
    int connectSocket = -1;

    int ret = 0;
    int one = 1;

    connectSocket = socket(res->ai_family, res->ai_socktype, res->ai_protocol);
    tSocketCloser closer = {connectSocket};
    /* SO_LINGER {1,0} and TCP_NODELAY were here */
    ret = setsockopt(connectSocket, SOL_SOCKET, SO_NOSIGPIPE, &one, sizeof(one));
    if(ret)
    {
      printf("client SO_NOSIGPIPE %d\n", ret);
      return NULL;
    }
    // O_NONBLOCK code was here
    ret = connect(connectSocket, res->ai_addr, static_cast<int>(res->ai_addrlen));
    if(ret)
    {
      printf("bad connect %d\n", ret);
      return NULL;
    }
    printf("good connect %d\n",connectSocket);

    char buffer[1024] = {0};
    ret = send(connectSocket, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0);
    printf("%d: send %d\n", count, ret);
    if(ret == -1)
      return NULL;

    ret = recv(connectSocket, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0);
    printf("%d: recv %d\n", count, ret);
    if(ret == -1)
      return NULL;
    printf("Success!\n");
  }
}

int main() {
  struct addrinfo hints;
  int error;
  char port[sizeof("65536") + 1] = "9999";
  std::memset(&hints, 0, sizeof(hints));
  hints.ai_family = PF_UNSPEC;
  hints.ai_socktype = SOCK_STREAM;
  hints.ai_flags = AI_PASSIVE | AI_ADDRCONFIG;

  // Wildcard address
  error = getaddrinfo(NULL, port, &hints, &res);
  if (error) {
    printf("getaddrinfo %d\n", error);
    exit(error);
  }

  for(int i = 0; i < 1000; ++i)
  {
    int sock = start_server();
    pthread_t clientThread = 0;
    pthread_create(&clientThread, NULL, short_connect, NULL);
    stop_server(sock);

    void* ignore;
    pthread_join(clientThread, &ignore);
  }
  return 0;
}

Here is some slightly annotated output:

listenSocket: 4  //what a good run looks like...
good connect 5
accept: 6
42: send 1024
clientClosing: 6
42: recv 1024
Success!
clientClosing: 5
clientClosed: 5
clientClosed: 6
good connect 5
accept: 6
43: send 1024
clientClosing: 6
43: recv 1024
clientClosed: 6
Success!
clientClosing: 5
clientClosed: 5
good connect 5   //client connects
44: send 1024
serverClosing: 4 //server starting close...
serverClosed: 4  //server done closing
44: recv -1      //recv errors out, as it should.  Note the lack of accept() calls
clientClosing: 5 //client teardown
clientClosed: 5
listenSocket: 4  //what a bad run looks like...
good connect 5
accept: 6
45: send 1024
clientClosing: 6
45: recv 1024
clientClosed: 6
Success!
clientClosing: 5
clientClosed: 5
good connect 5
accept: 6
46: send 1024
clientClosing: 6
clientClosed: 6
46: recv 1024
Success!
clientClosing: 5
clientClosed: 5   
serverClosing: 4  //server starting close...
good connect 5    //client connect
serverClosed: 4   //server done closing
47: send 1024     //successful send from client
                  //stuck in recv(), so we get no further prints

So the big question is... how can I close my listening socket without getting into this state? The CLOSE_WAIT state suggests that I need to close an accepted connection, but I don't have a socket / file descriptor to close. It also seems very odd that killing the program that hosts the server and the client doesn't cause the sockets to get cleaned up (the CLOSE_WAIT sockets were still in netstat hours later).

This all happened on OS X 10.8.3 x86_64.

share|improve this question
    
You definitely want to look up epoll/pselect –  Loki Astari Sep 20 '13 at 14:46
1  
Don't create threads like that. Create a thread pool (even if it only has one thread). Then add jobs to the thread pool to do the connection stuff. –  Loki Astari Sep 20 '13 at 14:47
    
This isn't the production code. This is a simplified example that doesn't pull in a huge amount of libraries. I'd be happy to add epoll, pselect, thread pools, and other technologies for this question if it seems like that would fix the socket leak. It isn't obvious to me how that would help though. –  user13251 Sep 20 '13 at 15:12
    
(1) What do you mean by 'I don't have a socket/file descriptor to close'? (2) What's the mystery about closing the listening socket? Just close it. (3) You don't need to shutdown a listening socket, and you don't need to shutdown any socket immediately before closing it unless you are using fork(). (4) Connections in CLOSE_WAIT state cannot survive the process. There is something wrong with your observations. (5) Printing -1 when you get an error isn't very illuminating. Try perror(). (6) You must error-check every socket operation, not just some of them. –  EJP Sep 22 '13 at 0:55
    
@EJP (1) When the client thread connects, netstat shows that the tcp stack has created a connection. The server side of the connection never called accept(), so it doesn't have a socket / fd for the connection. –  user13251 Sep 23 '13 at 13:12

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