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Does sed provide functionality to remove a number of separate patterns in line, but not all of them?

For example: I have a text file with the list of directories in it, and I need to remove 3 slashes from the lines containing EXACTLY 4 slashes, not 3, not 5 — 4.

Before:

/foo/bar
/foo/bar/baz/quux
/boo/bar/baz

After:

/foo/bar
foobarbaz/quux
/boo/bar/baz
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You seem to have the leading / missing in the last two lines in the input and output. Is that correct? –  devnull Sep 20 '13 at 14:14
    
I am sorry, corrected it :) –  ivx Sep 20 '13 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's easier using awk:

$ awk -F/ 'NF==5{print $2$3$4"/"$5;next;}1' inputfile
/foo/bar
foobarbaz/quux
/boo/bar/baz
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This solution is way easier than dealing with sed in some tricky way, thank you very much devnull! –  ivx Sep 20 '13 at 15:56

Match any lines that only has 4 / and perform the subsitution on those lines using GNU sed and rev:

% cat file
/1/2/3
/1/2/3/4
/1/2/3/4/5

% rev file | sed -r '\%(^[^/]+/){4}$%{s%/%%2g}' | rev
/1/2/3
123/4
/1/2/3/4/5
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You probably missed but not all of them. (The second line needs to have the last / preserved.) –  devnull Sep 20 '13 at 14:21
    
correct, missed that, you can do sed -r '/(^[/][^/]+){4}$/{s%/%%2g}' file but that's from left to right tho so you would need to do rev file | sed -r '/(^[^/]+[/]){4}$/{s%/%%2g}' | rev awk probably is better for this. –  iiSeymour Sep 20 '13 at 14:26
    
Sorry, just clarifying, would there be any way other than saying: sed -r '/(^[/][^/]+){4}$/{s%/%%;s%/%%;s%/%%}' file –  devnull Sep 20 '13 at 14:29
    
The only ways would be that or something along the line of what 1_CR did but both would be horrible for the case of line with 50 / say. @potong is the sed expert, he will know the clear way. –  iiSeymour Sep 20 '13 at 14:31
    
Aha! rev, that's nice. +1 –  devnull Sep 20 '13 at 14:49

This is crude but works. Much prefer the awk solution

sed  's:^/\([^/]\+\)/\([^/]\+\)/\([^/]\+\)\([^/]*/[^/]*\)$:\1\2\3\4:' file
/foo/bar
foobarbaz/quux
/foo/bar/baz/quux/dust
/boo/bar/baz
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