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I simply cannot figure out how to correctly output the numbers. I know it has something to do with how I have the cout, but I can't figure out exactly what it is.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
const int size = 10;
int values[size];

cout << "Please enter up tp 10 positive numbers." << endl;

for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
{
    cin >> values[i];
}

    cout << endl;
    cout << values[size];



system("pause");
return 0;

}
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4  
If you needed a loop to read them, you probably need a loop to print them also... –  Dark Falcon Sep 20 '13 at 14:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Here a hint: to print out the numbers, you need to use a loop.

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Ah, so I just simply needed another for loop. Simple enough, thanks! –  Gundown64 Sep 20 '13 at 14:33
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
const int size = 10;
int values[size];

cout << "Please enter up tp 10 positive numbers." << endl;

for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
{
    cin >> values[i];
}

    cout << endl;
for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
{
    cout << values[i]<<endl;
}



system("pause");
return 0;

}
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3  
You ruined the fun :D –  khajvah Sep 20 '13 at 14:27

You need to put another for loop below for when you print out the values. Currently you are only cout-ing the number at postion SIZE of your array. This is the last value.

Try something like this:

cout << "Your values are :" << endl;
for (int j=0; j < size; j++)
{
    cout << values[j] << " ";
}
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1  
Just to be clear: it's not the last value, it's out of bounds and therefore undefined behaviour. –  NPE Sep 20 '13 at 14:28
    
@NPE or segmentation fault ? –  khajvah Sep 20 '13 at 14:31
    
@khajvah: segfault is a special case of undefined behaviour. –  NPE Sep 20 '13 at 14:33

Use

for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
{
    cout << values[i];
}

Happy Learning :)

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you need another loop to output your values:

// Read Values
for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
{
    cin >> values[i];
}

// Print Values
for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
{
    cout << values[i];
}

cout << values[size];
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There is no way to recieve the all input and print it at the same time. You have to use 2 for loops for that. one to read the input and the other to print the array elements.

If you want to do it with less code, you can use the STL in c++. there is are vectors, LinkedLists, Queues.

they're acts like an array but you don't have to allocate memory for the elements.

You just write vector <int> myVector; To allocate memory for the vector, and then each time you add an element into the vector, it's allocate by itself a place. You don't need to worry about the allocations.

To add an element I think there is a function called "backInsert(object x)" this function add the new element to the and of the vector.

 x.backInsert(userInput); // user input is an integer

to print the vector you can use this

void printVector(const vector<int> &v)
{
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(),
    std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}

Edit: here is a simple program

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

void main()
{
    std::vector<int> x; 

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
        x.push_back(i+1);

    std::cout << "vector elements: \n";
    std::copy(x.begin(), x.end(),
        std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, " "));
}
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1  
Vector x = new Vector() be careful, we're in C++, not Java here ! –  SirDarius Sep 20 '13 at 14:42
    
@SirDarius, hehe you're right, my mistake.. I'm already thinking with Java programming.. thanks for the catch! I edited my answer. +1 –  Elior Sep 21 '13 at 21:18

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