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I am working on a C program that has been around forever. I recently moved from VS 2010 to VS 2012. I built an executable that works fine on my computer, but when others try to use it they get an error message saying that MSVCP110D.dll is missing, in spite of the fact that the program is being built in release mode (this program worked fine on other computers with older versions of VS, and I know of nothing I've changed in the program that would be relevant to this issue). To figure out the problem I built a test program from scratch that looks like this:

#include <stdio.h>

void main()
{
    fprintf(stdout, "Hello, world!\n");
    getchar();
    fflush(stdin);
}

I compiled it in release mode. My options are: /GS /GL /analyze- /W3 /Gy /Zc:wchar_t /Zi /Gm- /O2 /sdl /Fd"Release\vc110.pdb" /fp:precise /D "WIN32" /D "NDEBUG" /D "_CONSOLE" /D "_UNICODE" /D "UNICODE" /errorReport:prompt /WX- /Zc:forScope /Gd /Oy- /Oi /MD /Fa"Release\" /EHsc /nologo /Fo"Release\" /Fp"Release\TestVS2012.pch"

This program also runs fine from my computer, but on another computer I get the same error that MSVCP110D.dll is missing.

In this test program, I can solve the problem by changing the /MD option to /MT, but this fix doesn't work in the larger program I'm working with.

share|improve this question
    
Are you perhaps linking to some library that was compiled separately? –  Carey Gregory Sep 20 '13 at 14:56
    
I can't understand why /MD links to Debug dlls - it shouldn't, and it doesn't on my system. So I can't immediately see why changing to /MT made any difference. What does dependency walker show? –  Roger Rowland Sep 20 '13 at 15:15
    
MSVCP110D.dll is the debug build for pre-built C++ standard library classes like std::string and the iostream classes. Getting your test program to fail with this error requires a miracle, it doesn't use any of these classes. So there's something fundamentally wrong with your diagnosis or that machine. Getting a dependency on a debug library in the Release build is certainly possible, that happens when you link code that was compiled in the Debug configuration. Usually a .lib that you didn't build yourself. –  Hans Passant Sep 20 '13 at 15:26
    
Paste compile and link logs somewhere. –  djgandy Sep 20 '13 at 15:43
    
I'm sorry I disappeared for a while (emergency project). I just got back to working on this. Before I posted this question I had tried cleaning and rebuilding my whole project, but just now I deleted the release directory and built the project from scratch, and now it works. I'm still not sure what happened, but this seems to have fixed my problem. –  Paula Nov 12 '13 at 14:23

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