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I'm facing difficulties to figure out why my code is giving me this error

error 281 - Not enough variables in DATA statement

I am using the latest Silverfrost on Windows 8. The relevant piece of my module is,

...
INTEGER, parameter :: maxExampleTypes     =   5
TYPE ExampleInfo
    CHARACTER (len=50) :: ExDeckName
    INTEGER A(maxExampleTypes)
    INTEGER ExUnits
ENDTYPE ExampleInfo
TYPE(ExampleInfo) :: Example(10)
DATA Example(1)%ExDeckName/'test.dck'/
DATA Example(1)%A/1,2,3,4,5/
...

Curiously, when I only specify one variable for A with

DATA Example(1)%A/1/

the error disappears.

Have you got any idea where it could come from?

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to do? Do you (a) want to set default values the first time you use the subroutine, (b) set initial values every time the subroutine is called, or (c) use parameters? –  Alexander Vogt Sep 20 '13 at 15:51
    
(a), I try to set default values but last line "DATA Example(1)%A/1,2,3,4,5/" gives me an error –  Amzocks Sep 20 '13 at 15:57
    
Not to approve of the usage or anything, but this code works with gfortran, and i see no reason why it should not. Call it a bug in Silverfrost that isn't worth worrying about.. –  agentp Sep 20 '13 at 20:40
    
out of curiosity try giving a 50 char string.. –  agentp Sep 20 '13 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would never use the DATA statement in modern Fortran. Try

...
INTEGER, parameter :: maxExampleTypes     =   5
TYPE ExampleInfo
    CHARACTER (len=50) :: ExDeckName
    INTEGER            :: A(maxExampleTypes)
    INTEGER            :: ExUnits
ENDTYPE ExampleInfo
TYPE(ExampleInfo) :: Example(10)

Example(1)%ExDeckName = 'test.dck'
Example(1)%A          = (/ 1,2,3,4,5 /)
...

If the values are supposed to be default values, put them into the type declaration:

...
INTEGER, parameter :: maxExampleTypes     =   5
TYPE ExampleInfo
    CHARACTER (len=50) :: ExDeckName = 'test.dck'
    INTEGER            :: A(maxExampleTypes) = (/ 1,2,3,4,5 /)
    INTEGER            :: ExUnits
ENDTYPE ExampleInfo
TYPE(ExampleInfo) :: Example(10)
...

Sample test program:

module testmod
  implicit none
  INTEGER, parameter :: maxExampleTypes     =   5
  ! Type with default values
  TYPE ExampleInfo
      CHARACTER (len=50) :: ExDeckName = 'test.dck'
      INTEGER            :: A(maxExampleTypes)= (/ 1,2,3,4,5 /)
      INTEGER            :: ExUnits
  ENDTYPE ExampleInfo

contains
  subroutine init_ExampleInfo(array)
    implicit none
    type(ExampleInfo), intent(out):: array(:)
    integer                       :: i

    do i=1,size(array)
      array(i)%ExDeckName = 'test.dck'
      array(i)%A          = (/ 1,2,3,4,5 /)
    enddo
  end subroutine
end module

program test
  use testmod
  implicit none
  TYPE(ExampleInfo) :: Example(10)

  ! Initialize manually
  ! call init_ExampleInfo(Example)
  write(*,*) Example(1)%ExDeckName, Example(1)%A

  ! Set new values
  Example(1)%ExDeckName = 'test2.dck'
  Example(1)%A          = (/ 5,4,3,2,1 /)

  write(*,*) Example(1)%ExDeckName, Example(1)%A
end program
share|improve this answer
    
The first option brings an error: "Executable statements are not allowed inside a MODULE" and I'd like to stick to this formulation –  Amzocks Sep 20 '13 at 16:03
    
Can you compile the sample program I put into the answer? I guess there is a different issue in your code... –  Alexander Vogt Sep 20 '13 at 16:09
    
This one works fine but how to get the initialization out of the TYPE declaration ? –  Amzocks Sep 20 '13 at 16:16
    
If you want to define a customized structure constructor you can do it as described here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4262253/…. This is Fortran 2003 and not implemented by every compiler, though. –  Alexander Vogt Sep 20 '13 at 16:25
1  
But it requires to be called by the main program, can't we get something intrinsic to the module that initialized the array as we use the module....this makes no sense. You want the type to have an initial value but you don't want to call it and you don't want to define it in the TYPE. Are you even sure you know what it is that you want? –  Kyle Kanos Sep 20 '13 at 18:27

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