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I have the following code:

typedef struct my_data {
 char* name;
}my_data;

my_data data[]={
    { .name = "Peter" },
    { .name = "James" },
    { .name = "John" },
    { .name = "Mike" }
};


void loaddata()
{
    FILE * in;
    if((in = fopen("data.txt","rt")) != NULL) {
        memset(data, 0, sizeof(data));
        int i = 0;
        while(!feof(in))
        {
            fscanf(in,"%s", &data[i].name);
            i++;
        };
        fclose(in);
    }
}

to read contents and process them I use this:

for (i=0; i<sizeof(data)/sizeof(data[0]); i++)

but if the number of lines in file is less than the number of defined array I get a lot of empty records so I modified it into:

for (i=0; (i<sizeof(data)/sizeof(data[0])) && strlen(data[i].name)>0; i++)

which is working fine but I'm sure I will get errors if the number of lines in file will be larger than the defined array size.

Any idea how to make this code safe? To change array dynamically?

EDIT: this way is working with size 300

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

 typedef struct my_data {
    char name[100];
}my_data;

struct my_data data[300];

my_data data_arr[]={
    { .name = "Peter" },
    { .name = "James" },
    { .name = "John" },
    { .name = "Mike" }
};

void process_data()
{
    char name[100];
    int i;
    for (i=0; (i<sizeof(data)/sizeof(data[0])) && strlen(data[i].name)>0; i++) {
        sprintf(name, "%s", data[i].name);
        printf("%s\n", name);
    }
}

void load_data()
{
    int i = 0;
    FILE * in;
    if((in = fopen("data.txt","rt")) != NULL) {
        while(!feof(in))
        {
            fscanf(in,"%s", &data[i].name);
            i++;
        };
        fclose(in);
    }
    else
    {
        for (i=0; (i<sizeof(data_arr)/sizeof(data_arr[0])) && strlen(data_arr[i].name)>0; i++) {
            sprintf(data[i].name, "%s", data_arr[i].name);
        }
    }
    return;
}

int main()
{
    load_data();
    process_data();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Don't use feof to terminate your input loop. Check the result returned by fscanf instead. Use feof only after the loop as finished, and only if you want to determine whether the fscanf failed due to an end-of-file condition or an error condition. –  Keith Thompson Sep 20 '13 at 15:57

1 Answer 1

Arrays do not grow dynamically in C. So you have a few approaches:

  1. get a pointer to a block of memory (using malloc) and use realloc whenever you need more space for an array - and index into your pointer
  2. create a linked list using malloc for every new item you want to add to your list

Don't forget when using malloc to call free on every single block that you called malloc for.

share|improve this answer
    
I read about this and found some examples but I guess I couldn't implement it correctly because I got segmentation fault everytime –  Sam Reina Sep 20 '13 at 16:03
1  
@SamReina Memory management is hard. That's why excellent tools like valgrind exist to find memory management problems in your code. You could alternatively consider containers in C++ - they can dynamically grow (see Vector) if you don't want to deal with low level pointers and memory allocation. –  PP. Sep 20 '13 at 16:05
    
thanks a lot! you saved my day with this info. I don't need to use valgrind or gdb to check something that I already know is wrong. I can easily do it with: while(!feof(in)) { temp = malloc(sizeof(my_data)); if(temp_1 != NULL) temp_1->next = temp; fscanf(in,"%s ",temp->name); temp->next = NULL; ... bla bla but I also need default array in case file is missing, so if you can answer to my question I would thank you for that but don't give me solutions like valgrind for this specific problem. –  Sam Reina Sep 20 '13 at 16:18

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