Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm attempting to go through a large number bitwise tests, 32 to be exact, where there could be multiple matches. The only method I can think of that would work is to use a whole long list of if statements, e.g.

$test = 3;
if(($test & 1) == 1) {
    do something...
}
if(($test & 2) == 2) {
    do something else...
}

The other possibility I was thinking of to cut down on the code, although probably not by much is a switch statement. That said, I'm not even sure if what I am thinking of will even work:

$test = 3;
switch($test) {
    case ((1 & $test) == 1):
        do something...
        break;
    case ((2 & $test) == 2):
        //Will this run?
        do something else...
        break;
}

Will the break end the switch? Or will the switch continue and each case run that the bitwise operation returns true?

I ask because my actual program will have 32 different tests, and I don't want to write all 32 just to find it doesn't work and Google hasn't turned up anything on this.

If this doesn't work is there a solution that will, or am I relegated to a large number of if statements?

share|improve this question
    
@Jimbo Hah, yes, it is. Ty and updated. – Styphon Sep 20 '13 at 15:58
    
This is an unusual use of switches. Checkout the docs: php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php – Jim Sep 20 '13 at 15:58
    
@Jim I've used switches many times before. I guess this is more of an xy issue. I'll update my original question. – Styphon Sep 20 '13 at 15:59
    
I've updated my question to include my original intention. – Styphon Sep 20 '13 at 16:04
    
If you're going to downvote, at least comment why so I can improve. – Styphon Sep 20 '13 at 16:06
up vote 0 down vote accepted

No this is not the case. Only one of the switch cases will run in your example. As soon as break is encountered the switch processing ends. Only one branch will match. In PHP I think (but you might want to double check) the first matching case will run.

With multiple possible matches you will need to use a set of if statements (note do not use if...elseif)

I would convert to

if($test & 1) {
    // do stuff
}

if(test & 2) {
    // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer

Well first, using switch with int this way is not really recommended. It's not a good practice / not really readable / not comfortable. I would say it does not even work, although I have a doubt now... depending on versions and stuff, I'm not aware enough of these things.

Then, to answer your question, you only go inside the first matching case... then the break makes you leave the switch. However, you can omit the break and it will go through the second case.

Anyway, you should make more use of OOP to characterize better what you intend to do, and things will probably get more simple and clearer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.