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I am working on Linux (ubuntu 13.04 exactly) and currently I have a question: Why memory allocation will fail even when there is still enough memory?

I wrote a simple test application today and I encountered this issue when running this test app. Below is the code snippet I used to have the test:

     #include <stdio.h>
     #include <unistd.h>
     #include <list>
     #include <vector>
     #include <strings.h>

     using namespace std;
     unsigned short calcrc(unsigned char *ptr, int count)
     {
        unsigned short crc;
        unsigned char i;

        //high cpu-consumption code
        //implements CRC algorithm: Cylic 
        //Redundancy code              
     }


     void* CreateChild(void* param){
         vector<unsigned char*>  MemoryVector;
         pid_t PID = fork();
         if (PID == 0){
             const int MEMORY_TO_ALLOC =  1024 * 1024;
             unsigned char* buffer = NULL;
             while(1){
                 buffer  = NULL;
                 try{
                     buffer = new unsigned char [MEMORY_TO_ALLOC]();
                     calcrc(buffer, MEMORY_TO_ALLOC );
                     MemoryVector.push_back(buffer);
                 } catch(...){
                     printf("an exception was thrown!\n");
                     continue;
                 } //try ... catch
             } //while  
          } // if pid == 0

      return NULL;
      }

    int main(){
        int children = 4;
        while(--children >= 0){
            CreateChild(NULL);
        };

        while(1) sleep(3600);
        return 0;
    }

During my test, the above code starts throwing exception when there is around 220M RAM available. And from the moment on, it looks like the application is not able to get more memory any more because the free memory shown by TOP command remains to be above 210M. So why would this happen?

UPDATE
1. Software && Hardware Information
The RAM is 4G and swap is around 9G bytes. Running "uname -a" gives: Linux steve-ThinkPad-T410 3.8.0-30-generic #44-Ubuntu SMP Thu Aug 22 20:54:42 UTC 2013 i686 i686 i686 GNU/Linux
2. Statistic Data during the Test

      Right after Test App Starts Throwing Exception
      steve@steve-ThinkPad-T410:~$ free
                    total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
       Mem:       3989340    3763292     226048          0       2548      79728
       -/+ buffers/cache:    3681016     308324
       Swap:      9760764    9432896     327868

      10 minutes after Test App Starts Throwing Exception
      steve@steve-ThinkPad-T410:~$ free
                    total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
       Mem:       3989340    3770808     218532          0       3420      80632
       -/+ buffers/cache:    3686756     302584
       Swap:      9760764    9436168     324596


      20 minutes after Test App Starts Throwing Exception
      steve@steve-ThinkPad-T410:~$ free
                    total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
       Mem:       3989340    3770960     218380          0       4376     104716
       -/+ buffers/cache:    3661868     327472
       Swap:      9760764    9535700     225064

      40 minutes after Test App Starts Throwing Exception
      steve@steve-ThinkPad-T410:~$ free
                    total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
       Mem:       3989340    3739168     250172          0       2272     139108
       -/+ buffers/cache:    3597788     391552
       Swap:      9760764    9556292     204472
share|improve this question
    
It fails when it used 220M, or fails when 220M is free? Is it a 32 bit process? Did you check if the process has any memory limits set on it (ulimit or something? I dunno, I'm not a linux guy) How much memory and swap does the computer have? –  Mooing Duck Sep 20 '13 at 16:55
    
@MooingDuck fails when more than 210M ram available. Updated the post. –  Steve Sep 21 '13 at 13:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are running on x86-32 so your processes are 32-bit. Even with more memory + swap they will be limited by their address space, run:

grep “HIGHMEM” /boot/config-`uname -r`
grep “VMSPLIT” /boot/config-`uname -r`

to see how your kernel is configured.

Maybe your 4 child processes are limited to 3G and are using 12G + other processes ~700M to reach the numbers you are seeing.

EDIT:

So your kernel is configured to give each user-space process 3G of address-space, of which some will be taken up with the program, libraries and initial runtime memory (which will be shared due to the fork).

Therefore you have 4 children using ~3G each - ~12G + ~780M of other programs. That leaves about 220M free once the children start reporting errors.

You could just run another child process, or you could reinstall with AND64/x86-64 version of Ubuntu, where each process will be able to allocate much more memory.

share|improve this answer
    
The first one is "CONFIG_HIGHMEM64G=y CONFIG_HIGHMEM=y" –  Steve Sep 24 '13 at 13:41
    
The second one is "CONFIG_VMSPLIT_3G=y" –  Steve Sep 24 '13 at 13:44
    
@StevePeng So the answer is that your child processes are limited to 3G each. –  Douglas Leeder Sep 25 '13 at 6:44
    
yes, you are right. If I create 6 processes in my application, then after it starts throwing exceptions, the other applications slow down due to lack of memory and also no more processes can be started even the "free" shell command. –  Steve Sep 28 '13 at 13:25
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May be you have no more 1MB sequential memory pages in your address space. you have free space fragmentation.

share|improve this answer
    
and some memory that isn't used by heap. –  light_keeer Sep 20 '13 at 16:23
    
I agree - it's likely that there is fragmentation. Also, it's unclear what "there is around 210M memory" means. "memory" where? In the system? In the process? In swap? –  Jon Watte Sep 20 '13 at 16:57
    
@JonWatte The test app starts throwing exceptions when there is more than 210M ram (in the system). I updated the post. –  Steve Sep 21 '13 at 13:51
2  
It doesn't depend on how much memory in the system you have. Each 32 bit process (I suppose it is your case) has it's own 4 Gb address space. Almost 2 of them process can use (or 3 on some systems). and no more. so, how much memory does exactly this process use ?( I don't know how to check it in linux) –  light_keeer Sep 21 '13 at 14:43
    
Note that the process itself actually may have less than 4 GB of usable address space -- 2 GB or 3 GB are typical limits on 32-bit processes. Shared libraries, the executable, and stack(s) for thread(s) also take up address space. –  Jon Watte Sep 22 '13 at 18:56
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During my test, the above code starts throwing exception when there is around 220M memory. And from the moment on, it looks like the application is not able to get more memory any more because the free memory shown by TOP command remains to be above 210M. So why would this happen?

The output of top is updated every N seconds (configured), and doesn't really show the current status.

On the other hand, memory allocation is super fast.

What happens is your program eats memory, and at certain point (when top shows 200 Mb free) it starts failing.

share|improve this answer
1  
updated the post –  Steve Sep 21 '13 at 13:50
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