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I have a string that looks like this:

Hello Hello Hello<br>Hello Hello <br> hello hello

I'm trying to capture those <br> that are surrounded by characters using regex. So from the example string above, I should only capture the first <br> instance, and not the second one. I tried using this:

\w(<br/>)\w

But I am capturing the ends this: o<br>H

How can I get regex to capture only the <br> and not the surround characters as well?

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"Please also include a tag specifying the programming language or tool you are using." (from the [regex] tag description) –  Lev Levitsky Sep 20 '13 at 17:11
    
if you only want <br>,why do you want to capture it then?why not simply consider it as <br> –  Anirudha Sep 20 '13 at 17:15
    
Are you confusing the "matched data" (which includes the surrounding \w characters) with the "capture group" (the part matched by the expression within parentheses)? –  Peter Alfvin Sep 20 '13 at 17:16
    
Sorry for the confusion. I have updated my question a little more to explain why I'm doing this. –  Carven Sep 20 '13 at 17:17
    
The Question would be, what you really want to achieve? If you strip off the surrounding characters, you have no more chance to tell this <br> apart from others. See: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/66377/what-is-the-xy-problem –  dognose Sep 20 '13 at 17:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use look-around:

(?<=\w)<br>(?=\w)

(I'm not sure what the / was doing in your regex)

Though most languages allow you to extract the things you put in brackets, in which case you can leave your regex as is and just extract the first group (which would correspond to the first (and only) thing in brackets).

Explanation, courtesy of this site:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?<=                     look behind to see if there is:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \w                       word characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9, _)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of look-behind
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  <br>                     '<br>'
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?=                      look ahead to see if there is:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \w                       word characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9, _)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of look-ahead
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