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My assumption was when using absolute positioning, that it was relative to the parent div. However, this jsfiddle doesn't seem to mesh with that. What I'm attempting to do is have a three row liquid layout with a min-height set on the center row. The top and bottom have a fixed height. Unfortunately, I am coding only for IE7 and don't have the luxury of using min-height in my CSS. When using JQuery, the center does resize, however, the footer does not reposition relative to the parent. Information and jsfiddle below.

Browser: IE7

Styling: CSS

HTML: 4.0 Strict

JQuery: 1.10.1

jsfiddle

fiddle after adding position:relative and height 100% to wrapper jsfiddle

HTML

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="top"></div>
    <div id="center"></div>
    <div id="bottom"></div>
</div>

CSS

html, body{
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
}
#wrapper{
    background-color:blue;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
    margin:0px;
    padding:0px;
    min-width:700px;
}
#top{
    position:absolute;
    top:0px;
    width:100%;
    height:100px;
    min-width:700px;
    background-color:green;
}
#center{
    position:absolute;
    top:100px;
    bottom:20px;
    min-width:700px;
    width:100%;
    background-color:yellow;
}
#bottom{
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0px;
    min-width:700px;
    width:100%;
    height:20px;
    background-color:purple;
}

JQuery

var resizeTimer = false;
        function doResize() {
            if ($("body").height() == 500) {
                //do nothing
            }
            else if ($("body").height() < 500) {
                $("#wrapper").height(500);
                $("#center").height(380);

            }
            else {
                $("#wrapper").height("auto");
                $("#center").height("auto");
            }
            resizeTimer = false;
        }

        $(window).on("resize", function () {
            if (resizeTimer) {
                clearTimeout(resizeTimer);
            }
            resizeTimer = setTimeout(doResize, 300);
        });
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Absolute positioning is relative the closest parent (going up the parent chain) that has position set on it (like position: relative or position: absolute). If no parents in the parent chain have positioning set, then absolute positioning is relative to the document boundaries.

If you want position: absolute to be relative to the parent, the set position: relative on the parent. That will not change the position of the parent, but will scope the positioning of the children to be relative to the parent rather than relative to some higher level parent or document.

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that causes and odd disappearing act for my divs on resize. See new jsfiddle. –  steventnorris Sep 20 '13 at 17:19
    
Scratch that. Needed a 100% in the jquery as opposed to auto. See js fiddle at jsfiddle.net/wQAmA/1. You get the accept since you were first. Thanks! –  steventnorris Sep 20 '13 at 17:21

The position is not relative to the parent, it's relative to the closest parent that has positioning (or the document, if no parent has positioning).

Add position:relative to the CSS for the parent element to make it have positioning without actually moving it anywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
That causes a strange disappearing act for my divs on resize. see new jsfiddle –  steventnorris Sep 20 '13 at 17:19
    
Scratch that. Needed a 100% in the jquery as opposed to auto. See js fiddle at jsfiddle.net/wQAmA/1. –  steventnorris Sep 20 '13 at 17:22

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