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I have a sparse data set, one whose number of columns vary in length, in a csv format. Here is a sample of the file text.

12223, University
12227, bridge, Sky
12828, Sunset
13801, Ground
14853, Tranceamerica
14854, San Francisco
15595, shibuya, Shrine
16126, fog, San Francisco
16520, California, ocean, summer, golden gate, beach, San Francisco

When I use

read.csv("data.txt", header = F)

R will interpret the data set as having 3 columns because the size is determined from the first 5 rows. Is there anyway to force r to put the data in more columns?

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Do you know the maximum number of columns in your data set? –  Blue Magister Sep 20 '13 at 17:29
    
Yes, the maximum number of columns is known –  CompChemist Sep 20 '13 at 17:30
1  
My intuition is that specifying the colClasses argument in read.table (with the max number of columns) in combination with fill = TRUE should read the file in. –  Blue Magister Sep 20 '13 at 17:38
1  
@BlueMagister I thought so too, but it doesn't work. –  Roland Sep 20 '13 at 17:40
    
could you make a dummy data.frame with 2 rows and the correct number of columns, and then rbind the text file to it? –  John Paul Sep 20 '13 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

You could read the data like this:

dat <- textConnection("12223, University
12227, bridge, Sky
12828, Sunset
13801, Ground
14853, Tranceamerica
14854, San Francisco
15595, shibuya, Shrine
16126, fog, San Francisco
16520, California, ocean, summer, golden gate, beach, San Francisco")

dat <- readLines(dat)
dat <- strsplit(dat, ",")

This results in a list.

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1  
The data set that I have is large. I am looking for a solution without copying and pasting the contents of the file. I know I can open the file in ruby and search for the largest amount of commas in a line and move that line to the first row. I could then then open the file in R and all would be solved, but I was hoping for a simple solution in R. –  CompChemist Sep 20 '13 at 17:43
2  
Well, obviously you would use a file connection (read ?connection). But I don't have access to your file ... –  Roland Sep 20 '13 at 17:44
2  
@CompChemist Put your file object (data.txt) in place of dat. The textConnection was used to quickly read in your example file. –  Blue Magister Sep 20 '13 at 17:44
    
Thanks! I understand now. I appreciate your help –  CompChemist Sep 20 '13 at 17:46

Deep in the ?read.table documentation there is the following:

The number of data columns is determined by looking at the first five lines of input (or the whole file if it has less than five lines), or from the length of col.names if it is specified and is longer. This could conceivably be wrong if fill or blank.lines.skip are true, so specify col.names if necessary (as in the ‘Examples’).

Therefore, let's define col.names to be length X (where X is the max number of fields in your dataset), and set fill = TRUE:

dat <- textConnection("12223, University
12227, bridge, Sky
12828, Sunset
13801, Ground
14853, Tranceamerica
14854, San Francisco
15595, shibuya, Shrine
16126, fog, San Francisco
16520, California, ocean, summer, golden gate, beach, San Francisco")

read.table(dat, header = FALSE, sep = ",", 
  col.names = paste0("V",seq_len(7)), fill = TRUE)

     V1             V2             V3      V4           V5     V6             V7
1 12223     University                                                          
2 12227         bridge            Sky                                           
3 12828         Sunset                                                          
4 13801         Ground                                                          
5 14853  Tranceamerica                                                          
6 14854  San Francisco                                                          
7 15595        shibuya         Shrine                                           
8 16126            fog  San Francisco                                           
9 16520     California          ocean  summer  golden gate  beach  San Francisco

If the maximum number of fields is unknown, you can use the nifty utility function count.fields (which I found in the read.table example code):

count.fields(dat, sep = ',')
# [1] 2 3 2 2 2 2 3 3 7
max(count.fields(dat, sep = ','))
# [1] 7

Possibly helpful related reading: Only read limited number of columns in R

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Thank you, that was extremely helpful –  CompChemist Sep 20 '13 at 20:13

This does seem to work (following @BlueMagister's suggestion):

tt <- read.table("~/Downloads/tmp.csv", fill=TRUE, header=FALSE, 
          sep=",", colClasses=c("numeric", rep("character", 6)))
names(tt) <- paste("V", 1:7, sep="")

     V1             V2             V3      V4           V5     V6             V7
1 12223     University                                                          
2 12227         bridge            Sky                                           
3 12828         Sunset                                                          
4 13801         Ground                                                          
5 14853  Tranceamerica                                                          
6 14854  San Francisco                                                          
7 15595        shibuya         Shrine                                           
8 16126            fog  San Francisco                                           
9 16520     California          ocean  summer  golden gate  beach  San Francisco
share|improve this answer
    
I've just tried again. This doesn't works if I use the text argument. –  Roland Sep 20 '13 at 21:33
    
Aha.. so that was the reason.. good to know this difference! Thanks for writing back. –  Arun Sep 20 '13 at 21:52

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