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I'm trying to implement an algorithm to verify the 4 neighbout (up, down, left and right) pixels of an RGB image, if all pixel RGB values are equal I mark an pixel in the output image as 1, otherwise it will be 0. The non vectorized implementation is:

def set_border_interior(img):
  img_rows = img.shape[0]
  img_cols = img.shape[1]
  res = np.zeros((img_rows,img_cols))
  for row in xrange(1,img_rows-1):
      for col in xrange(1,img_cols-1):
          data_b = set()
          data_g = set()
          data_r = set()
          up = row - 1
          down = row + 1
          left = col - 1
          right = col + 1

          data_b.add(img.item(row,col,0))
          data_g.add(img.item(row,col,1))
          data_r.add(img.item(row,col,2))

          data_b.add(img.item(up,col,0))
          data_g.add(img.item(up,col,1))
          data_r.add(img.item(up,col,2))

          data_b.add(img.item(down,col,0))
          data_g.add(img.item(down,col,1))
          data_r.add(img.item(down,col,2))

          data_b.add(img.item(row,left,0))
          data_g.add(img.item(row,left,1))
          data_r.add(img.item(row,left,2))

          data_b.add(img.item(row,right,0))
          data_g.add(img.item(row,right,1))
          data_r.add(img.item(row,right,2))

          if (len(data_b) == 1) and (len(data_g) == 1) and (len(data_r) == 1):
              res.itemset(row,col, False)
          else:
              res.itemset(row,col, True)
  return res

This non vectorized way, but it is really slow (even using img.item to read data and img.itemset to set new values). Is there a better way to implement this in Numpy (or scipy)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Leaving the border aside, where your function is not well defined anyway, you could do the following:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

rows, cols = 480, 640
rgb_img = np.zeros((rows, cols, 3), dtype=np.uint8)

rgb_img[:rows//2, :cols//2] = 255

center_slice = rgb_img[1:-1, 1:-1]
left_slice = rgb_img[1:-1, :-2]
right_slice = rgb_img[1:-1, 2:]
up_slice = rgb_img[:-2, 1:-1]
down_slice = rgb_img[2:, 1:-1]

all_equal = (np.all(center_slice == left_slice, axis=-1) &
             np.all(center_slice == right_slice, axis=-1) &
             np.all(center_slice == up_slice, axis=-1) &
             np.all(center_slice == down_slice, axis=-1))

plt.subplot(211)
plt.imshow(rgb_img, interpolation='nearest')
plt.subplot(212)
plt.imshow(all_equal, interpolation='nearest')
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick answer! In my function I started in row 1 and end in height-1 and started in col 1 til width-1. How can I set this boundaries using slices? –  Guilherme Defreitas Sep 20 '13 at 18:29
    
That's basically what the above code is doing: the return all_equal array is two items shorter in both directions, missing the first (index 0) and last (index n-1), which is the same you were doing, I believe. –  Jaime Sep 20 '13 at 19:10

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