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How can both the following codes execute (The codes are same except the semicolon in second line)

This code is expected to execute and does so as well.

#include<stdio.h>
#define SWAP(a, b) int t; t=a, a=b, b=t  //note here is no semi-colon at the end
int main()
{
    int a=10, b=12;
    SWAP(a, b);
    printf("a = %d, b = %d\n", a, b);
    return 0;
}

But the following is not expected to run as SWAP(a, b) will be replaced by int t; t=a, a=b, b=t;;.So two semi-colons should produce error!!!

#include<stdio.h>
#define SWAP(a, b) int t; t=a, a=b, b=t;  //note the semi-colon here
int main()
{
    int a=10, b=12;
    SWAP(a, b);
    printf("a = %d, b = %d\n", a, b);
    return 0;
}
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2  
where do you get the idea that two semicolons should produce an error? –  filipe Sep 20 '13 at 18:15
    
Why should “two semi-colons should produce [an] error”? Have you tried a simple test to see whether the compiler accepts ;; (without using your macro)? Does it produce any errors or warnings? –  Joshua Taylor Sep 20 '13 at 18:17
1  
"two semi-colons should produce error!!!" - why? –  user529758 Sep 20 '13 at 18:17
1  
@filipe I would just make that a function anyway. –  user529758 Sep 20 '13 at 18:22
2  
@filipe: This version will not work well under if. For example, if (1) SWAP(a, b); else; will not compile. This is why we use do{}while(0) idiom for macros, instead of just a pair of {}. –  AndreyT Sep 20 '13 at 18:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The stray semi-colon becomes a null statement which is perfectly legitimate in C.

You could prove this by adding a line with a dozen semi-colons to your code.

Separately, your macro would be better written as:

#define SWAP(a, b) do { int t = a; a = b; b = t; } while (0)

This works better if you try to do two different swaps in a single block of code.

share|improve this answer
    
Few days ago I saw a similar post in which ;; caused a big problem. But I don't remember which post was that. –  haccks Sep 20 '13 at 18:15
    
Intriguing — can you dig that out? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 20 '13 at 18:18
    
Yes. At that time I run that code. I am searching for that post. –  haccks Sep 20 '13 at 18:20
    
My bad! Didn't find that. But AFAIR, that macro was about loop. –  haccks Sep 20 '13 at 19:01

Extra semicolons in local scope will never produce an error in C (after C99) if used as in your macro. They simply introduce an empty statement. Where did you get the idea that it should be an error? One can concoct an example that would trigger, say, an "orphaned else" error because of an extra semicolon, but your macro is not usable under if anyway (see below).

In C89/90 it was possible to trigger an error through an inadvertently placed extra semicolon after a declaration, because in C89/90 it was illegal to mix declarations and statements. For example

int a, b;;  /* <- A declaration followed by an empty statement */
int c;      /* <- ERROR: Illegal declaration after a statement */

But in C99 it is not a problem, since declarations and statements can be mixed. Your SWAP is obviously implemented for C99 so this issue does not immediately apply though.

It is worth noting that such implementation of SWAP is pretty poor and quite dangerous. It might lead to unexpected, dangerous and completely meaningless behavior in contexts like

if (/* whatever */)
  SWAP(a, b);

Better follow the do/while(0) idiom and do something like

#define SWAP(a, b) do { int t; t=a, a=b, b=t; } while (0)

Note - no semicolon at the end.

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You can, of course, get burned on if (X) macroA else macroB;, if macroA generates a gratuitous ; at the end. –  Hot Licks Sep 20 '13 at 18:32
    
@Hot Licks: Yes, but the OP's macro is implemented as a declaration followed by a statement. Such implementation is not usable undef if (as in your example) for reasons that have nothing to do with the trailing ;. It won't work (will lead to "orphaned else") in this context regardless of whether there is a trailing ; in the macro or not. –  AndreyT Sep 20 '13 at 18:34
    
The original macro, used with an if without braces, it tries to declare t as the body of the if but that isn't allowed. Things go downhill from there. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 20 '13 at 20:00

A semi colon on its own is an "empty statement," a statement that does nothing.

It is sometimes useful, but most of the time it's an error. For example this if-statement does not have the intended effect:

if (x == y);
{
    z=1;
}

Despite this fact, it's a perfectly valid part of the C language.

share|improve this answer

After using

gcc -E file_name.c you'll get for second code :-

int t; t=a, a=b, b=t;;

which is a valid

and equivalent to

int t; t=a, a=b, b=t;

; // null statement does nothing
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