Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to write a C program which creates a UNIX shell. In this shell when a UNIX command is typed, the shell should execute it in the foreground or background (background when & is specified). I'm getting the command to run in the foreground but I can't run it in the background. Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define MAX_LENGTH 1024
#define DELIMS " \t\r\n"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *cmd, *bg;
    char line[MAX_LENGTH];
    pid_t fpid,bpid;
    int status;
    while (1)
    {
           fpid=10;
           bpid=10;
            printf("myshell > ");
            if (!fgets(line, MAX_LENGTH, stdin))
                    break;
             int j=0;

            if(cmd = strtok(line, DELIMS))
            {

                    bg = strtok(line," ");
                    while(bg!=NULL)
                    {
                            printf("%s",bg);
                            bg = strtok(NULL, " ");
                            if(strcmp(bg, "&") == 0)
                                    break;
                    }

                    printf("%s", bg);
                    if(strcmp(cmd,"exit")==0)
                            break;

                    else if(strcmp(bg,"&")==0)
                    {
                            bpid=fork();
                            //waitpid(bpid,&status,0);
                            system(line);
                            exit(0);
                    }
                    else
                   {
                            //fpid=fork();
                            //if(fpid==0)
                            //{
                                    system(line);
                            //      exit(0);
                            //}
                            //else 
                            //{
                            //      waitpid(fpid,&status,0);
                            //}
                    }
            }
    }

  return(0);
}

Can someone please help me in this program? I really need this for my homework.

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by bmargulies, Mark, talonmies, Yu Hao, Eric Brown Sep 22 '13 at 7:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – bmargulies, Mark, Yu Hao, Eric Brown
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
First rule of using strtok: do not use strtok. – Eugene Sep 20 '13 at 19:20
    
@Eugene than what do I use in place of strtok ? – user2201650 Sep 20 '13 at 19:22
    
strtok_r is the reentrant version – Eugene Sep 20 '13 at 19:24
    
Can you explain it with my code? – user2201650 Sep 20 '13 at 19:24
    
There are some serious compilation errors in this code that you should fix before submitting it to SO. If the file is called fork.c, then GCC 4.8.1 gives errors such as: fork.c:33:20: error: incompatible types when assigning to type ‘char *[100]’ from type ‘char *’ at if(cmd = strtok(line, DELIMS)) and fork.c:46:21: warning: passing argument 1 of ‘strcmp’ from incompatible pointer type [enabled by default] at if(strcmp(cmd,"exit")==0) with note /usr/include/string.h:87:6: note: expected ‘const char *’ but argument is of type ‘char **’ int strcmp(const char *, const char *); – Jonathan Leffler Sep 21 '13 at 18:13

Read the manpage for fork(). The return code of 0 means that you are in the child, non-zero (non-negative) means you are the parent. You should have different logic based on that and use system() (or better exec*() in the child branch.

Here's the typical logic you should have:

tokenize(line)

if (last token is '&') {
    rc = fork();

    if (rc < 0)
        handle error;

    else if (rc > 0) {  /* in parent, rc = child pid */
        do whatever you planned to do in the parent process
    }
    else {  /* in child */
        use exec*() to start the child command
    }
}
else {  /* foreground execution */
    use system() to run command
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for getting back to me. I'm kind of not used to program much with C. Do you mind elaborating more/editing my code? The program should parse the user input in the shell to get the & and then execute it in the background. – user2201650 Sep 20 '13 at 18:31
    
See the updated comment – Alexander L. Belikoff Sep 20 '13 at 18:35
    
So in which part does the code for background process fit in? And how do I parse for the last token i.e., & ? – user2201650 Sep 20 '13 at 18:40
    
1. Your background process is started in the line "use exec*() to start the child command." 2. To parse for '&' you need to tokenize the command (and not just by blanks as foo& is a valid command as well) and strcmp(tokens[ntoks - 1], "&") – Alexander L. Belikoff Sep 20 '13 at 18:42
    
I'm sorry but I still don't get it :( Do you mind providing an example or editing my code? – user2201650 Sep 20 '13 at 18:50

Here is code derived from the code in the question that emits a prompt, gets the line of input, splits it into tokens, detects that the last token is &, and detects that the first word is exit and exits the loop. It prints out what its found, carefully. And you now need to handle the fork, exec, wait etc code.

#include <assert.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define MAX_LENGTH 1024
#define DELIMS " \t\r\n"

int main(void)
{
    char line[MAX_LENGTH];
    char *ps1 = "toysh> ";

    while (fputs(ps1, stdout) > 0 && fgets(line, sizeof(line), stdin) != NULL)
    {
        char *cmd[100];
        char *bg = NULL;
        int j = 0;
        char *tokens = line;

        while ((cmd[j++] = strtok(tokens, DELIMS)) != NULL)
            tokens = NULL;

        assert(j < 100);
        /* The line has been tokenized into j-1 tokens */
        /* Print the tokens found */
        for (int i = 0; i < j; i++)
        {
            if (cmd[i] != 0)
                printf("%d: <<%s>>\n", i, cmd[i]);
            else
                printf("%d: NULL pointer\n", i);
        }

        assert(j > 0);
        if (j == 1)
            continue;   // No command

        j--;

        assert(j > 0);
        if (strcmp(cmd[j-1], "&") == 0)
        {
            printf("== Found &\n");
            bg = cmd[j-1];
            cmd[--j] = 0;
            if (j == 0)
            {
                puts("Syntax error: cannot have & on its own");
                continue;
            }
        }

        if (strcmp(cmd[0], "exit") == 0)
        {
            printf("== Found exit command\n");
            if (bg != NULL)
            {
                puts("Can't run exit in background");
                continue;
            }
            break;
        }

        /*
        ** Now you can do your fork, exec, waitpid work.  Note that the
        ** command is already split into words with the null pointer at
        ** the end.  This is what execv(), execve() and execvp() want
        */

    }
    putchar('\n');

    return(0);
}

Note that the code does not prevent you from entering too many tokens on a single line. It eventually detects that you've done so, if it hasn't already crashed, via an assert. You'll need to make that bullet-proof at some point.

Request for further assistance

I'm very new to the fork and waitpid work. Can you help me here?

You've been given good advice in the other answer.

Add:

#include <sys/wait.h>

Add:

static void run_command(char **argv, int bg_flag);

Add:

        /*
        ** Now you can do your fork, exec, waitpid work.  Note that the
        ** command is already split into words with the null pointer at
        ** the end.  This is what execv(), execve() and execvp() want
        */
        run_command(cmd, (bg != NULL));

New function:

static void run_command(char **argv, int bg_flag)
{
    pid_t pid;

    fflush(0);   // Flush pending output

    if ((pid = fork()) < 0)
        printf("Fork failed\n");
    else if (pid > 0)
    {
        /* Parent shell */
        if (bg_flag == 0)
        {
            int status;
            int corpse;
            while ((corpse = waitpid(-1, &status, WNOHANG)) >= 0)
            {
                if (corpse != 0)
                    printf("Process %d exited with status 0x%.4X\n",
                           corpse, status);
                if (corpse == 0 || corpse == pid)
                    break;
            }
        }
        else
            printf("%d: %s running in background\n", pid, argv[0]);
    }
    else
    {
        /* Child process */
        execvp(argv[0], argv);
        fprintf(stderr, "%d: failed to execute %s (%d: %s)", (int)getpid(), argv[0], errno, strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
    }
}

You get to decide how verbose your shell should be, but while you're debugging it, more information is better than less.

Also, the error messages should all go to stderr; I've left a fair number going to stdout.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm very new to the fork and waitpid work. Can you help me here? Basically if "ls" is typed, the command should run in the foreground by displaying the list of files present in the directory. If "ls &" is typed, then the command should be executed in the background and should immediately display the prompt "myshell >" – user2201650 Sep 21 '13 at 19:11
    
I preferred the toysh name (names beginning with 'my' annoy me, whether they're documents folders or DBMS or shells). See the updates. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 21 '13 at 20:38
    
Thank you so much @JonathanLeffler. Your updated code is working fine in the background. But when I type "ls &" it is printing "ls is executing in the background" and also printing the ls output. I don't want it to print the the output of ls. How do I do that? – user2201650 Sep 22 '13 at 17:05
    
You have to provide standard output to the command, so after forking, you can close standard output, and then open() the null device, /dev/null, and use dup2() to ensure that it is connected to STDOUT_FILENO (aka file descriptor 1) (and close() the file descriptor if it wasn't originally opened on 1) so that the child process will write to /dev/null. Of course, if you're doing I/O redirection (> some.file), then you open that file instead of /dev/null. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 22 '13 at 19:27
    
I'm sorry but I didn't understand many things there. :( because I'm a newbie – user2201650 Sep 22 '13 at 22:29

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.