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Hi I am trying to generate random numbers in MATLAB with a random MEAN value.

For example, if I use

e = mean(rand(1000,1))

the answer for e will always be close to 0.5. What I want is for the value of e (mean) to be random, so that e can be 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, etc...

Is it correct for me to use e = mean( unifrnd(0,1,[1000,1]) ) ?

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Perhaps you want to generate normally distributed random numbers X~N(0,1) with randn. Then you can change the mean and standard deviation to be random. As an example:

N = 1000;
mu = rand*10 - 5;            %# mean in the range of [-5.0 5.0]
sigma = randi(5);            %# std in range of 1:5
X = randn(N, 1)*sigma + mu;  %# normally distributed with mean=mu and std=sigma
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if you want the sample to have exactly a given mean mu, then I would force the sample mean to be that value:

x = some_random_variable_generator(arguments);
x = x + (mu - mean(x));

then you're done.

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What other properties do you want? You can do something like this:

nums = (rand(1000,1)+rand())/2

That will shift your array a random number, also shifting the mean. This would keep the same standard deviation though. Something like this would change both:

nums = (rand(1000, 1)*rand()+rand())/2
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hi,i tried nums =mean( rand(1000,1)+rand()). i performed the calculation many times and sometimes i get a value of mean of >1. shouldn't the value of mean be between 0 and 1 if im generating random numbers between 0 and 1 –  Tan Wei Jin Dec 12 '09 at 5:44
    
Yes, but you're adding two random numbers together, so you can get some higher than 1. If you want to constrain your results to be between 0 and 1, try the new edit –  Dan Lorenc Dec 12 '09 at 7:10

You must explain what distribution you want of the mean. Sure, you want it random, but there is order even in randomness. Please explain.

If you want a normally distributed mean, you can scale the variables [z = (x - mu) / sigma] and change mu randomly. If you need another distribution for the mean, similar formulas exist.

Again, please explain further.

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Instead why don't you just generate random numbers, and change the generated range of numbers based on where the mean is at vs where you want the mean to be?

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hi, thanks for the quick response. how to i determine where the mean is at? i want the mean to be random can be 0.9 or can be 0.1 not centred around 0.5...i think it has something to do with distribution but im not sure –  Tan Wei Jin Dec 12 '09 at 5:17
    
Oh I thought you were trying to generate random numbers that made a specific mean. –  Sneakyness Dec 12 '09 at 6:54

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