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Whilst asking another question (and also before) I was wondering how do I judge whether to create an object on the heap or keep it as an object on the stack? What should I ask myself about the object to make the correct allocation?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Put it on the heap if you have to, the stack if you can.

What kinds of things do you need to put on the heap? Anything of varying length. Any object that might need to be null. Anything that's very large, lest you cause a stack overflow.

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Simple answer.

When it goes out of scope, do you want it to hang around and be able to use it?

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1  
It should be noted that it's also not a good idea to put gigantic objects on the stack even if they fulfill the other criteria. Especially no fun in c++ to overrun your stack limits.. –  Voo Sep 21 '13 at 0:37
    
@Voo Yes, but how often does that happen? Container classes allocate their memory dynamically, so I think it's safe to say that an object of size 1KB is (a) huge and (b) rare. Let's consider a call stack of depth 50 with 20 of these huge objects in every function's stack frame, and you're still only at a 1MB stack. –  us2012 Sep 21 '13 at 12:26
    
@voo - You can increase the stack size. You can also write code without the heap - as is required in a variety of safety critical industries, –  Ed Heal Sep 21 '13 at 12:52
    
And having to change an OS specific limitation to execute your code doesn't strike you as particularly bad design? Especially problematic if the limit depends on the input size. @us2012 Rare situation? I'd really hope so, but what does that have to do with advice about what to do if you are in exactly one of those? –  Voo Sep 21 '13 at 14:15
    
@voo - If the software has fixed inputs (as does a power station) and the software needs to run 24 x 7 from ages, avoiding memory fragmentation and the issues associated with dangling pointers then no. Welcome to the world of safety critical software# –  Ed Heal Sep 21 '13 at 15:44

Depends on intended lifetime of the object.

  • If you want the object to be alive even after function returns, then HEAP, else STACK

If an object is placed in the HEAP, then it must be explicitly free()'ed by the programmer, once its usage is over; otherwise the program will be leaking memory.

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Unless, of course, you return said object from the function. Then there are lots of cases in which it's good to return the object by value rather than a pointer to it. –  us2012 Sep 20 '13 at 22:30
    
Need to consider static data –  Ed Heal Sep 20 '13 at 22:30

Two reasons to use the heap:

1- You want the data after the current scope.

2- You want to reserve large memory.

Other than that stay on stack.

Note: don't reserve a lot of memory on the stack, or you'll get a "Stack-overflow" ;)

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